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e-Book Making Government Manageable: Executive Organization and Management in the Twenty-First Century epub download

e-Book Making Government Manageable: Executive Organization and Management in the Twenty-First Century epub download

Author: Thomas H. Stanton,Thomas Stanton
ISBN: 0801878314
Pages: 320 pages
Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press (April 16, 2004)
Language: English
Category: Social Sciences
Size ePUB: 1400 kb
Size Fb2: 1275 kb
Size DJVU: 1159 kb
Rating: 4.3
Votes: 478
Format: lrf docx doc txt
Subcategory: Other

e-Book Making Government Manageable: Executive Organization and Management in the Twenty-First Century epub download

by Thomas H. Stanton,Thomas Stanton



Making Government Manageable: Executive Organization and Management in the Twenty-First Century.

Making Government Manageable: Executive Organization and Management in the Twenty-First Century.

Thomas Stanton is a Fellow at the Center for Advanced Governmental Studies at Johns Hopkins University, where .

What are the basic concepts of executive organization and management? .

What are the basic concepts of executive organization and management? How does executive organization affect management? How can executive organization and management be improved? In Making Government Manageable, Thomas H. Stanton and Benjamin Ginsberg bring together a distinguished group of authorities from both the academic and political worlds to explore problems relating to the organization and management of government. The authors begin with a brief overview of the development of executive organization and management to the present day.

Making Government Manageable book. How can executive organization and management be improved? In Making Government Manageable, Thomas H.

Thomas H. Stanton, Benjamin Ginsberg. What are the basic concepts of executive organization and management? How does executive organization affect management?

Thomas H.

Executive Organization and Management in the Twenty-First Century

Executive Organization and Management in the Twenty-First Century. Johns Hopkins University Press. In Making Government Manageable, Thomas H. They then offer examples of problems in federal department organization and management.

Making Government Manageable. Executive Organization and Management in the Twenty-First Century.

Making Government Manageable analyzes these issues and provides thoughtful observations and actionable recommendations for policymakers and public managers. PA Times According to the authors of this insightful volume, several recent changes in public management have tended to 'disaggregate government.

Moses of South Carolina: A Jewish Scalawag during Radical Reconstruction (2010) Johns Hopkins University Press. ISBN 978-0-8018-9464-0.

There are over . million nonprofit organizations in the United States, a number that has increased by over 30 percent in the past decade. 1 This includes public charities active in health care, religion, culture, education, human services, and the environment. It also includes advocacy organizations, labor unions, business and professional associations, and social and recreational clubs.

What are the basic concepts of executive organization and management? How does executive organization affect management? How can executive organization and management be improved? In Making Government Manageable, Thomas H. Stanton and Benjamin Ginsberg bring together a distinguished group of authorities from both the academic and political worlds to explore problems relating to the organization and management of government.

The authors begin with a brief overview of the development of executive organization and management to the present day. They then offer examples of problems in federal department organization and management. They also raise the question of the effectiveness of third-party government―cases in which the private sector under contract with the government performs services for which the government is responsible and, in the process, makes policy for which the government becomes responsible. The authors conclude with a discussion of cases in which agencies have enjoyed some measure of success through reforming and reorganizing their internal structures and processes.

Contributors: Murray Comarow, National Academy of Public Administration; Matthew A. Crenson, the Johns Hopkins University; Alan L. Dean, National Academy of Public Administration; Dan Guttman, The Johns Hopkins University and the National Academy of Public Administration; Dwight Ink, Institute of Public Administration; Ronald C. Moe, the Johns Hopkins University and National Academy of Public Administration; Sallyanne Payton, University of Michigan Law School; Beryl A. Radin, University of Baltimore and National Academy of Public Administration; Harold Seidman, formerly U.S. Bureau of the Budget; Barbara S. Wamsley, National Academy of Public Administration and the Johns Hopkins University.