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e-Book Tradition of the Law and Law of the Tradition: Law, State, and Social Control in China (Contributions in Criminology and Penology) epub download

e-Book Tradition of the Law and Law of the Tradition: Law, State, and Social Control in China (Contributions in Criminology and Penology) epub download

Author: Xin Ren
ISBN: 0313290962
Pages: 200 pages
Publisher: Praeger (March 25, 1997)
Language: English
Category: Social Sciences
Size ePUB: 1789 kb
Size Fb2: 1254 kb
Size DJVU: 1823 kb
Rating: 4.3
Votes: 287
Format: lrf docx lrf azw
Subcategory: Other

e-Book Tradition of the Law and Law of the Tradition: Law, State, and Social Control in China (Contributions in Criminology and Penology) epub download

by Xin Ren



Xin Ren has succeeded admirably in this scholarly, readable, and useable book in tracing the Chinese traditions of law and government as they coalesced into the present sytem.

Xin Ren has succeeded admirably in this scholarly, readable, and useable book in tracing the Chinese traditions of law and government as they coalesced into the present sytem. This book offers a. well organized ideological, imperial, and historical study of Chinese legal tradition and its influence on contemporary Chinese law and government.

In this volume, the author presents the tradition of law in China as an exception to the Western model of social control. The Confucian bureaucracy that has long structured Chinese social life melded almost seamlessly with the Maoist revolutionary agenda to produce a culture in which collectivism and an internalized adherence to social law are, in some respects, congenital features of Chinese social consciousness

Xin Ren has brought Chinese concepts of philosophy and law and of past and present cultures of Confucian and communist thought about deviance and crime into contemporary focus. There is at once both a blending and a bleeding opposition of these mighty concepts.

Xin Ren has brought Chinese concepts of philosophy and law and of past and present cultures of Confucian and communist thought about deviance and crime into contemporary focus. I have scrupulously studied the criminal code of China since 1979 and in it I have found elements of Confucianism and elements of the traditional Marx-Lenin-Mao philosophy. Life is precious and, therefore, crime is anathema both to Confucianism and to communism.

Tradition of the Law and Law of the Tradition: Law, State, and Social Control in China

Tradition of the Law and Law of the Tradition: Law, State, and Social Control in China. Xin Ren. For decades, social control theorists in the West have gradually lost their political thrust and become structurally and psychologically centered. That is, they have become more concerned with the socialization process-by which individuals either conform to social norms or incline toward social deviance-and less concerned with society's role in reinforcing informal control forces.

3 This is a tradition that goes back to 19th century positivist approaches to. .Through social interaction, individuals are labelled deviant or come to recognize themselves as deviant.

Crime and the Law. Identify and differentiate between different types of crimes. Evaluate Canadian crime statistics. This is a tradition that goes back to 19th century positivist approaches to deviance, which attempted to find a biological cause for criminality and other types of deviant behaviour. The Italian professor of legal psychiatry Cesare Lombroso (1835–1909) was a key figure in positivist criminology who thought he had isolated specific physiological characteristics of degeneracy that could distinguish born criminals from normal individuals (Rimke 2011).

Traditional Chinese law refers to the laws, regulations and rules used in China up to 1911, when the last imperial dynasty fell. It has undergone continuous development since at least the 11th century BC.

The sociology of law (or legal sociology) is often described as a sub-discipline of sociology or an interdisciplinary approach within legal studies. Some see sociology of law as belonging "necessarily" to the field of sociology, but others.

Law and Revolution, I book. He also questions conventional social theory, which has paid insufficient attention to the origin of modem Western legal systems and has therefore misjudged the nature of the crisis of the legal tradition in the twentieth century.

In the common-law tradition, it is conceived through a formal and .

In the common-law tradition, it is conceived through a formal and substantive framework. In essence, it centres on the supremacy of the law over the arbitrary exercise of power and the formal legality of the law (Tamanaha, 2004, p. 115; Cotterrell, 1992, p. 157). The rule-of-law concept has been criticised as being of unique European origin, where plural social organisation and universal natural law constitute its two preconditions (Unger, 1977, pp. 80–110). Horowitz, Richard (2004) ‘International Law and State Transformation in China, Siam, and the Ottoman Empire during the Nineteenth Century’, Journal of World History 15(5): 445–486.

Traditionally, social theorists in the West have structured models of state social control according to the tenet that socialization is accomplished by means of external controls on behavior: undesirable actions are punished and desirable actions result either in material reward or a simple respite from the oppressive attentions of an authoritarian state. In this volume, the author presents the tradition of law in China as an exception to the Western model of social control. The Confucian bureaucracy that has long structured Chinese social life melded almost seamlessly with the Maoist revolutionary agenda to produce a culture in which collectivism and an internalized adherence to social law are, in some respects, congenital features of Chinese social consciousness. Through her investigation of the Maoist concept of revolutionary justice and the tradition of conformist acculturation in China, the author constructs a fascinating counterpoint to traditional Western arguments about social control.