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e-Book Cuba and Its Music: From the First Drums to the Mambo epub download

e-Book Cuba and Its Music: From the First Drums to the Mambo epub download

Author: Ned Sublette
ISBN: 1556525168
Pages: 688 pages
Publisher: Chicago Review Press; First Edition edition (May 1, 2004)
Language: English
Category: Music
Size ePUB: 1594 kb
Size Fb2: 1718 kb
Size DJVU: 1491 kb
Rating: 4.6
Votes: 664
Format: txt lrf mbr azw
Subcategory: Photography

e-Book Cuba and Its Music: From the First Drums to the Mambo epub download

by Ned Sublette



Ned Sublette explains why in his marvelous book The variations of Cuban music from the earliest to the 1940's is shown with thought and love.

Ned Sublette explains why in his marvelous book. I find myself pouring over passages, rereading and underlining and making notes to myself in the back. I can't take a lot of this at one time. I'll put the book down to pick it up a week later and end up rereading what I'd already read. The prospect of getting all the way to the end of it fills me with joy and dread at the same time. The variations of Cuban music from the earliest to the 1940's is shown with thought and love. Recommended for folks interested in Cuba, Latin music, blues, jazz, the African diaspora, and those who like a good read.

this is the on. -The Nation. Ned, a New Yorker, has painted with a latin passion a huge fresco of Cuba and its music with exquisite and astounding details. A real page turner! -Georges Collinet, host of Afropop Worldwide.

Cuba and Its Music book. This entertaining history of Cuba and its music begins with the. Author Ned Sublette also details the music from Africa pre-conquest and the regional variations of African music and how that contributed to the creation of Cuban music and what shape that took due to the region where the bulk of Cuban slaves came from. In the first half of the book, digging deep, Sublette touches on religion, how the African slaves kept their religion, mixed it slightly with Catholicism and what effects this had on the music.

This entertaining history of Cuba and its music begins with the collision of Spain and Africa and continues through the era of Miguelito Valdes . About the author (2007). Ned Sublette is the co-founder of the Qbadisc record label.

This entertaining history of Cuba and its music begins with the collision of Spain and Africa and continues through the era of Miguelito Valdes, Arsenio Rodriguez, Benny More, and Perez Prado. It offers a behind-the-scenes examination of music from a Cuban point of view, unearthing surprising, provocative connections and making the case that Cuba was fundamental to the evolution of music in the New World. He has co-produced the public radio program 'Afropop Worldwide' for seven years and travelled frequently to Cuba since 1990. He lives in New York City.

This entertaining history of Cuba and its music begins with the collision of Spain and Africa and continues through the . This is the finest book on the sociological basis of music I have ever read

This entertaining history of Cuba and its music begins with the collision of Spain and Africa and continues through the era of Miguelito Valdés, Arsenio Rodríguez,. This is the finest book on the sociological basis of music I have ever read. Many good books will provide a new fact on each page or two, but I seem to learn three new bits of history on every single page of this extensive analysis of the origins of musical styles in Cuba.

he-mambo-cuban 2/5 mbo/Cuban 10/30/12Music from A to. .

he-mambo-cuban 2/5 mbo/Cuban 10/30/12Music from A to Z/Cubano Be, Cu. his dictionary is an indispensable source for music journalists, the student of Cuban music, and scholars alike. Ned Sublette is a musician, record producer, former coproducer of the public radio program Afropop Worldwide, and co-founder of the record label Qbadisc. His Cuba and Its Music is a lengthy (over 575 pages) historical narrative of Cuban music that the author organizes into seven parts totaling 36 chapters.

With Cuba and its Music, New York musician, producer, and musicologist Ned Sublette takes on the mammoth task of piecing together a story for outsiders (and especially Americans). He's well aware of the enormity of his mission: Afro-Cuban culture didn't happen in history, exactly, because for a long time nobody was writing it down

We were all surprised when Ned Sublette came out with his hit recording .

We were all surprised when Ned Sublette came out with his hit recording Cowboy Rumba (Palm Pictures) in 1999. It was the perfect-yet totally unexpected and d of country-western and Afro-Caribbean music.

Antonio Arcaño described the mambo as follows: "Mambo is a type of syncopated montuno that possesses the rhythmic charm, informality and . Sublette, Ned. Cuba and its Music: From the First Drums to the Mambo.

Antonio Arcaño described the mambo as follows: "Mambo is a type of syncopated montuno that possesses the rhythmic charm, informality and eloquence of the Cuban people. The pianist attacks the mambo, the flute picks it up and improvises, the violin executes rhythmic chords in double stops, the double bass inserts a tumbao, the timbalero plays the cowbell, the güiro scrapes and plays the maracas rhythm, the indispensable tumba (conga drum) reaffirms the bass tumbao and strengthens the timbal.

This entertaining history of Cuba and its music begins with the collision of Spain and Africa and continues through the era of Miguelito Valdés, Arsenio Rodríguez, Benny Moré, and Pérez Prado. It offers a behind-the-scenes examination of music from a Cuban point of view, unearthing surprising, provocative connections and making a case for Cuba as fundamental to the evolution of music in the New World. Revealed are how the music of black slaves transformed 16th-century Europe, how the claves appeared, and how Cuban music influenced ragtime, jazz, and rhythm and blues. Music lovers will follow this journey from Andalucía, the Congo, the Calabar, Dahomey, and Yorubaland via Cuba to Mexico, Puerto Rico, Saint-Domingue, New Orleans, New York, and Miami. The music is placed in a historical context that considers the complexities of the slave trade; Cuba's relationship to the United States; its revolutionary political traditions; the music of Santería, Palo, Abakuá, Vodú, and much more.
Vetibert
This is the finest book on the sociological basis of music I have ever read. Many good books will provide a new fact on each page or two, but I seem to learn three new bits of history on every single page of this extensive analysis of the origins of musical styles in Cuba. But this is more than about Cuba; it is about Al-Andalus/Sefarad and Renaissance Spain and the eary history of the United States, and about northwest and central African peoples, and about Renaissance Europe, and about the early history of Islam and Arabia. It is about differing social policy and its effect on the slave trade. It is about what gave New Orleans jazz the Latin tinge and makes that city a treasure. It is about the distinct origins of the polyrhythmic, polytonal structures of Afro-Cuban and Afro-Brazilian music and the recitative, glissando-embellished, monorhythmic music of the blues and later jazz. We learn about Louis Gottchalk's first use of the African drum in classical music [performed in Europe] and why such instruments were banned in England's continental colonies and the early United States since 1739. We learn how Moorish, that is, black, line dance style was once the rage of western Europeans, and led to England's Morris dances. These are among the smallest of factoids that you will encounter reading this highly readable yet scholarly book.

Because I admire and particularly enjoy multidisciplinary cultural histories, Sublette's book is a feast. His explorations are ours. You will be fascinated, and you will be delighted. The book is an education. Buy it.
Talrajas
I've probably reviewed this before. It is the best ever. If you love the music, this is a book you can wallow in. Just wonderful and stresses the African heritage. From drum choirs in the coastal forests of West Africa to Willie Colon on the streets of New York, this book, at over 600 pages, covers it all. BUT... it only goes to the 50s, so I can't wait till volume 2 comes out.
Erennge
It's a first for me to review a book I haven't finished reading. I've been reading Cuba and Its Music for about a year, off and on, as I've read other books and material. What's prompting me to review it now is that this is simply a terrific, wonderful book and the word needs to get out. Full disclosure: despite being a musician all my life, I discovered Cuban music only about twenty years ago. The more I learned about it the more it took me over. This is not the place to go into the reasons, but I will make an outrageous blanket statement and say that what Bach is to classical music, Cuban music is to popular music.

Ned Sublette explains why in his marvelous book. I find myself pouring over passages, rereading and underlining and making notes to myself in the back. I can't take a lot of this at one time. I'll put the book down to pick it up a week later and end up rereading what I'd already read. The prospect of getting all the way to the end of it fills me with joy and dread at the same time. It's not that it's densely written: on the contrary, it's some of the clearest, easiest to read scholarly writing I've ever run across (and that's a lot, by the way).

The book is not for everyone. You have to like music, for starters. Then, it would be good if you enjoy learning about how musical styles originate, travel, and influence other styles. Cuba has been a true melting pot for many of the world's musical traditions, and most have made their way to this country, through New Orleans, through New York, and by other means, to the point that its influence is discernible in almost every popular American genre today. Sublette has traced these influences in the most careful and understandable way, and the result is enlightenment on every single page.

Now I hear that Sublette has another book out on the musical cultures and history of New Orleans. This is wonderful news even if it means I'll spend the next five years finishing both volumes. Amazon won't let me review a book twice, so I won't be able to comment on the latter parts of Cuba and Its Music here. Maybe I'll be able to mention it when I finally report on The World that Made New Orleans: From Spanish Silver to Congo Square.