» » Swing Changes: Big-Band Jazz in New Deal America
e-Book Swing Changes: Big-Band Jazz in New Deal America epub download

e-Book Swing Changes: Big-Band Jazz in New Deal America epub download

Author: David W. Stowe
ISBN: 0674858255
Pages: 299 pages
Publisher: Harvard University Press (June 24, 1998)
Language: English
Category: Music
Size ePUB: 1891 kb
Size Fb2: 1360 kb
Size DJVU: 1761 kb
Rating: 4.8
Votes: 798
Format: azw lrf mobi docx
Subcategory: Photography

e-Book Swing Changes: Big-Band Jazz in New Deal America epub download

by David W. Stowe



SWING CHANGES: Big Band Jazz in New Deal America. Пользовательский отзыв - Kirkus.

SWING CHANGES: Big Band Jazz in New Deal America. This excellent book on the Swing Era, its music and meaning, is a model of interdisciplinary social history, combining music, business, economics, and politics in a seamless and fascinating chronicle. Swing changes: big-band jazz in New Deal America. Библиографические данные.

Swing Changes looks at New Deal America through its music and shows us how the contradictions and tensions within swing - over race, politics, its own cultural status, the role of women - mirrored those played out Bands were playing, people were dancing, the music business was booming. It was the big-band era, and swing was giving a new shape and sound to American culture.

This excellent book on the Swing Era, its music and meaning, is a model of interdisciplinary social history, combining .

This excellent book on the Swing Era, its music and meaning, is a model of interdisciplinary social history, combining music, business, economics, and politics in a seamless and fascinating chronicle. examines swing as a reflection of changes in American ideology, the product of new technologies that allowed it to pervade American life in an unprecedented fashion, and, even more important, as a phenomenon that ""forced America to confront its own indebtedness to African-American culture as never before.

Blackface - For other uses, see Blackface (disambiguation).

Lists Forum Books Performance Data new. Ephemera Libretto Instruments. New List New Article New Book New Video New Post New Score new. Home Journals American Music 1998 Vol. 16 No. 1. David W. Stowe, Swing Changes. Big-Band Jazz in New Deal America. Deveaux, S. (1998) David W. Stowe, Swing Changes: Big-Band Jazz in New Deal America. In: American Music, Vol. 16, No. 1, pp. 87-90.

a b Stowe, David Ware, Swing Changes: Big-Band Jazz in New Deal America. Cite magazine requires magazine (help). cagney, bogeaus close studio deal the new york times. Cambridge, Massachusetts : Harvard University Press, 1998, ISBN 9780674858268. 1 aug 1946: 30. ^ Jane Greer Attains Dramatic Highroad Schallert, Edwin. Los Angeles Times 16 Sep 1946: A2.

Swing Changes: Big-Band Jazz in New Deal America by David Stowe Harvard, 299 pp, £1. 5, October . 5, October 1994, ISBN 0 674 85825 5. In the élite minority arts of the 20th century, the US component is one of many, and by no means the most important. The most immediate impact of Roosevelt’s America on jazz came through the political Left, ranging from New Deal enthusiasts for a democratic people’s culture to the Communist Party, which took jazz to its bosom from 1935 on.

David W. Stowe, Swing Changes: Big-Band Jazz in New Deal America (Cambridge, Mass. and London: Harvard University Press, 1994, £1. 5)

David W. 5). Pp. 299. ISBN 0 674 85825 5.

Swing Changes: Big-Band Jazz in New Deal America more. Bands were playing, people were dancing, the music business was booming. It was the big-band era, and swing was giving a new shape and sound to American culture more. How might tracing flows of musical and religious practice help us theorize and historicize our understanding of transnationalism and globalization? How have cultural forms like music been shaped and changed by the flows of people, products and belief systems within a large landmass like Eurasia?

How Sweet the Sound: Music in the Spiritual Lives of Americans, and Swing Changes: Big Band Jazz in New Deal America. Stowe teaches English and Religious Studies at Michigan State University. His most recent book is Song of Exile. He’s also the author of many other books, including No Sympathy for the Devil: Christian Pop Music and the Transformation of American Evangelicalism, How Sweet the Sound: Music in the Spiritual Lives of Americans, and Swing Changes: Big Band Jazz in New Deal America.

Bands were playing, people were dancing, the music business was booming. It was the big-band era, and swing was giving a new shape and sound to American culture. In Swing Changes, David Stowe looks at New Deal America through its music and shows us how the contradictions and tensions within swing - over race, politics, its own cultural status, the role of women - mirrored those played out in the larger society. In its simultaneous acceptance and challenge of contemporary attitudes and stereotypes, swing reflected broader cultural impulses at the same time that it modified them.Although its musical roots extended back to the 1920s, swing seemed to many to come out of nowhere in 1935, inspiring a welter of conflicting descriptions and explanations. Stowe explores this history to suggest why the music of Goodman and Ellington caught so many unawares, and why it fired so many - and so many different - imaginations when it emerged in full force. He links the music to the politics of the time, to prevailing ideas about race relations, and to the complex culture industry that was evolving in the 1930s. At its commercial apex in the early 1940s, swing was readily adapted to World War II, and Stowe reveals how the music served the cause as a symbol of national unity, even as this service worked to undermine the utopian values swing expressed. He follows the failure of swing to keep its unlikely cultural coalition together and describes the subsequent attempts of bebop to pick up where the big band left off. Drawing on memoirs, oral histories, newspapers, magazines, recordings, photographs, literature, and films, Swing Changes offers a vibrant picture of American society at a pivotal time, and a new perspective on music as a cultural force.
Shadowredeemer
Good, thanks.
Painbrand
This book's conceptutal framework works very well in an American social/cultural history course that I teach that includes a focus on the 1930s.