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e-Book The History of Jazz epub download

e-Book The History of Jazz epub download

Author: Ted Gioia
ISBN: 019512653X
Pages: 480 pages
Publisher: Oxford University Press; Reprint edition (December 17, 1998)
Language: English
Category: Music
Size ePUB: 1187 kb
Size Fb2: 1584 kb
Size DJVU: 1380 kb
Rating: 4.4
Votes: 383
Format: rtf lrf txt lrf
Subcategory: Photography

e-Book The History of Jazz epub download

by Ted Gioia



Ted Gioia's herculean The History of Jazz.

Ted Gioia's herculean The History of Jazz. navigates this wild country with immense sophistication, scholarship, and wit. In fact, Gioia's History stands a good chance of becoming the standard guide for general readers and academics. After having purchased and read Gioia's superb book on blues, I naturally wanted to read up on jazz and its history, and this book for the most part is extremely passionate, accurate, and has made points I had thought of myself, such as the indelible influence on jazz from both the blues and especially ragtime, particularly the works of Scott Joplin.

Ted Gioia's History of Jazz has been universally hailed as a classic-acclaimed by jazz critics and fans around the world. Gioia tells the story of jazz as it had never been told before, in a book that brilliantly portrays the legendary jazz players, the breakthrough styles, and the world in which it evolved.

The History of Jazz book. Now, in "The History of Jazz, " Ted Gioia tells the story of this music as it has never been told before, in a book that brilliantly portrays the legendary jazz players, the breakthrough styles, and the world in which jazz evolved.

Gioia's most recent book, The History of Jazz, was selected as one of the twenty best books of the year by Jonathan Yardley in the Washington Post, and has earned praise for its expansive and balanced survey of the entire jazz tradition from Buddy Bolden to Wynton Marsalis. Gioia's current interests cover a wide range of musical areas.

Ted Gioia (born 21 October 1957) is an American jazz critic and music historian who wrote The History of Jazz and Delta Blues, both selected as notable books of the year by The New York Times. He is also a jazz musician and one of the founders of Stanford University's jazz studies program

Now, in Ted Gioia's The History of Jazz, we have at last a book that captures all these colors on one glorious palate. Knowledgeable, vibrant, and comprehensive, it is among the small group of books that can truly be called classics of jazz literature.

Now, in Ted Gioia's The History of Jazz, we have at last a book that captures all these colors on one glorious palate. Pages: 710. ISBN 13: 9780195126532. -James Sullivan, San Francisco Chronicle. Anyone looking for a balanced, well-written popular history of jazz will certainly find both readable and reliable. -The Wall Street Journal.

By TED GIOIA Oxford University Press. The history of jazz is closely intertwined with many of these other hybrid genres, and tracing the various genealogies can prove dauntingly complex. The Prehistory of Jazz The Africanization of American Music. An elderly black man sits astride a large cylindrical drum. For example, minstrel shows, which developed in the decades before the Civil War, found white performers in blackface mimicking, and most often ridiculing, the music, dance, and culture of the slave population.

Ted Gioia's History of Jazz has been universally hailed as a classic-acclaimed by jazz critics and fans . Burns Delivers the Pictures, but Giola Gives You the Text. Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 18 years ago.

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Jazz is the most colorful and varied art form in the world and it was born in one of the most colorful and varied cities, New Orleans. From the seed first planted by slave dances held in Congo Square and nurtured by early ensembles led by Buddy Belden and Joe "King" Oliver, jazz began its long winding odyssey across America and around the world, giving flower to a thousand different forms--swing, bebop, cool jazz, jazz-rock fusion--and a thousand great musicians. Now, in The History of Jazz, Ted Gioia tells the story of this music as it has never been told before, in a book that brilliantly portrays the legendary jazz players, the breakthrough styles, and the world in which it evolved. Here are the giants of jazz and the great moments of jazz history--Jelly Roll Morton ("the world's greatest hot tune writer"), Louis Armstrong (whose O-keh recordings of the mid-1920s still stand as the most significant body of work that jazz has produced), Duke Ellington at the Cotton Club, cool jazz greats such as Gerry Mulligan, Stan Getz, and Lester Young, Charlie Parker's surgical precision of attack, Miles Davis's 1955 performance at the Newport Jazz Festival, Ornette Coleman's experiments with atonality, Pat Metheny's visionary extension of jazz-rock fusion, the contemporary sounds of Wynton Marsalis, and the post-modernists of the Knitting Factory. Gioia provides the reader with lively portraits of these and many other great musicians, intertwined with vibrant commentary on the music they created. Gioia also evokes the many worlds of jazz, taking the reader to the swamp lands of the Mississippi Delta, the bawdy houses of New Orleans, the rent parties of Harlem, the speakeasies of Chicago during the Jazz Age, the after hours spots of corrupt Kansas city, the Cotton Club, the Savoy, and the other locales where the history of jazz was made. And as he traces the spread of this protean form, Gioia provides much insight into the social context in which the music was born. He shows for instance how the development of technology helped promote the growth of jazz--how ragtime blossomed hand-in-hand with the spread of parlor and player pianos, and how jazz rode the growing popularity of the record industry in the 1920s. We also discover how bebop grew out of the racial unrest of the 1940s and '50s, when black players, no longer content with being "entertainers," wanted to be recognized as practitioners of a serious musical form. Jazz is a chameleon art, delighting us with the ease and rapidity with which it changes colors. Now, in Ted Gioia's The History of Jazz, we have at last a book that captures all these colors on one glorious palate. Knowledgeable, vibrant, and comprehensive, it is among the small group of books that can truly be called classics of jazz literature.
Kalv
After having purchased and read Gioia's superb book on blues, I naturally wanted to read up on jazz and its history, and this book for the most part is extremely passionate, accurate, and has made points I had thought of myself, such as the indelible influence on jazz from both the blues and especially ragtime, particularly the works of Scott Joplin. I am pleased to have discovered Bix Beiderbecke and Jack Trambauer and ordered an incredible CD featuring the legendary cornetist, saxophonist, and as a plus, some tunes with jazz guitarist Eddie Lang spicing up the tunes. Truly, Beiderbecke, and others of the Chicago early jazz scene lifted the Dixieland New Orleans style from its somewhat flamboyant styles and started the movement that would become swing in a few years.
Plus, my admiration for Benny Goodman, Duke Ellington and Charlie Christian was verified by Gioia, certainly a far more educated person on jazz than most people ever will be. And this from a guy who also loves metal, blues, classic rock, the early rockers like the Beach Boys, Chuck Berry, Beatles, Dave Clark Five, etc. The musician in me is attracted to so many styles it's ridiculous. We learn of the beginnings of Miles Davis' unbelievable early recordings, including the one album most consider maybe the greatest jazz album of all time, "Kind of Blue". Coltrane, Ornette Coleman, Charlie Parker, on through fusion and today's state of the genre are all well represented.
However, I must take great exception with this book for a good reason in my opinion, and it cost Gioia a star: he seems nearly indifferent to some of the greatest players ever, mainly the guitarists. And the B-3 organ, especially discounting the great Jimmy Smith and his many many albums with greats like Kenny Burrell, Wes Montgomery and Grant Green among them. Gioia even goes so far as to consider this form of bebop and hard bop as hackneyed, if you can believe that. Only scant attention is paid to Montgomery, who was and remains the greatest jazz guitarist in history. Eddie Lang is mentioned, as is Django Reinhardt, but only Charlie Christian in the author's mind seems to merit more than just passing commentary.
I find this one sided and unfair. Fact is, jazz guitar reaches more people, with titans like Burrell especially on his magnum opus "Midnight Blue" playing with an incredible combination of blues and hard bop style. No less guitar greats than Jimi Hendrix, who loved Burrell and Stevie Ray Vaughan sung his praises, with Vaughan performing a fine cover of "Chitlins Con Carne" Grant Green is receiving more attention now, ironically as he died from drug abuse in 1979. But his funky stylings are still popular, as are his brilliant earlier recordings with Sonny Clarke, Jimmy Smith, Stanley Turrentine, Elvin Jones and Art Blakey.
Pat Metheny is mentioned, but consider this list of guitarists Gioia deigned to even acknowledge, preferring instead to obsess over horn players and pianists as if guitars were hardly worthy of his attention. At no point do we read about George Van Eps, Pat Martino, Jimmy Bruno, Danny Gatton's fine jazz output, Russell Malone, or the incredible Stanley Jordan. Nor do we get any mention of Mike Stern, and other well known players.
This is not an oversight - it's a disrespectful and deliberate commentary on what Gioia clearly considers an instrument worthy of mention only in the most unavoidable instances. This is puzzling, as he clearly understands guitar music as evidenced by his book on the blues.
But the history of the wonderful world of jazz music is still well worth the time to read. I will not disparage other instrumentalists endemic to the form, but I must confess as a guitar player, I am biased about the exclusion of its importance. Frankly to me, monosyllabic instruments that can only play one note at a time are severely limited in their scope and have to rely on other musicians for chord colorings, expressive solos, etc. I really have difficulty telling one saxophone player from another unless the style is unusually prominent. For example, Coleman Hawkins, one of the longest lived heroes of jazz has a more laid back approach than John Coltrane. Benny Goodman managed to forge a distinct style on the clarinet, and Miles Davis in his "cool" phase had a great tone. The less said about his material beginning with "Bitches Brew" the better in my view, as it remains to me a convoluted unfocused barrage of tones that are the aural equivalent of pretentious and frankly, worthless modern art.
We are unlikely to see a more complex but readable history of the jazz world, however, and Gioia's research and knowledge are indeed encyclopedic. Just expect a LOT of coverage on saxophones.
Qulcelat
If you happen to be new to the subject of jazz history - as I was 17 years ago when I read the first edition of this book, in paperback - then this book is a very good place to start. Back then I had only a minimal knowledge of the big names and movements in jazz history, but I was very eager to expand my jazz knowledge beyond the "smooth jazz" that was ruling the airwaves at the time. This is a great deal of information and I learned so much the first time (and ended up buying a lot of great CDs as a result), but many of the names and their stories went over my head. Also, logistically the paperback version features large pages, very long chapters, and small print. So it was very challenging to read when there wasn't much "white space".

Fast forward 17 years, to the second edition (on my Kindle, so I can adjust the print size), and on the second swipe of this book the pieces began to fall in to place. This is not a quick, easy read and when the author mentions styles of music and cites specific songs - you just want the book to jump out and start playing these songs! I heard spotify is a good way to do this but it would take months to finish the book if you tried to hear everything. The best "sound" companion to this would be the Ken Burns "Jazz" documentary from 2000, which I have watched several times. It's not completely comprehensive, that would take five times as long, but you can hear a lot of the styles and learn some of the basics. Then you can start enjoying America's greatest contribution to music. And you'll have your favorites as I do: Billie Holiday (what's my dog's name?), Miles Davis, Duke Ellington, Thelonius Monk, Ella Fitzgerald, and so many more...
Samutilar
Ted Gioia writes a very unbiased book on the history of jazz. Many of the documentaries/books have lots of opinions, but Ted Gioia tries to remain neutral. We had to read this book for my first year in Jazz Studies at the Eastman School of Music