e-Book Homeland epub download

e-Book Homeland epub download

Author: Dale Maharidge
ISBN: 1583226273
Pages: 296 pages
Publisher: Seven Stories Press; A Seven Stories Press 1st Ed edition (July 4, 2004)
Language: English
Category: Photography & Video
Size ePUB: 1266 kb
Size Fb2: 1744 kb
Size DJVU: 1110 kb
Rating: 4.4
Votes: 103
Format: azw lit mbr doc
Subcategory: Photography

e-Book Homeland epub download

by Dale Maharidge



Homeland is Pulitzer Prize winning author Maharidge's biggest and most ambitious book yet, weaving together the disparate and contradictory strands of contemporary American society-common decency alongside race rage.

Homeland is Pulitzer Prize winning author Maharidge's biggest and most ambitious book yet, weaving together the disparate and contradictory strands of contemporary American society-common decency alongside race rage.

Dale Maharidge (born 24 October 1956) is an American author, journalist and academic best known for his collaborations with photographer Michael Williamson. Maharidge and Williamson's book And Their Children After Them won the Pulitzer Prize for General Non-Fiction in 1990.

By Dale Maharidge Photographed by Michael Williamson. By Dale Maharidge Photographed by Michael Williamson. Homeland is Pulitzer Prize winning author Maharidge’s biggest and most ambitious book yet, weaving together the disparate and contradictory strands of contemporary American society-common decency alongside race rage, the range of dissenting voices, and the roots of discontent that defy political affiliation. Here are American families who can no longer pay their medical bills, who’ve lost high-wage-earning jobs to NAFTA.

None of my printed books have come close to this level of response

Professor at Columbia University's Graduate School of Journalism. None of my printed books have come close to this level of response. you will lose it a time or two.

Homeland is Pulitzer Prize winning author Maharidge's biggest and most ambitious book yet, weaving together the disparate and contradictory strands of contemporary American society-common decency alongside race rage, the range of dissenting voices, and the roots of discontent that defy political affiliation.

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Book Description Homeland is Pulitzer Prizea?winning author Maharidge's biggest and most . Dale Maharidge is among the very few American journalists attempting to describe the full range of the American experience.

Book Description Homeland is Pulitzer Prizea?winning author Maharidge's biggest and most ambitious book yet, weaving together the disparate and contradictory strands of contemporary American society-common decency alongside race rage, the range of disse. Похожие книги: And Their Children After Them : The Legacy of Let Us Now Praise Famous Men. Dale Maharidge. Here are American families who can no longer pay their medical bills, who've lost high-wage-earning jobs to NAFTA.

Homeland is Pulitzer Prize winning author Maharidge's biggest and most ambitious book yet, weaving together the disparate and contradictory strands of contemporary American society-common decency alongside race rage, the range of dissenting voices, and the roots of discontent that defy political affiliation. Here are American families who can no longer pay their medical bills, who've lost high-wage-earning jobs to NAFTA. And here are white supremacists who claim common ground with progressives. Maharidge's approach is rigorously historical, creating a tapestry of today as it is lived in America, a self-portrait that is shockingly different from what we're used to seeing and yet which rings of truth.
Mot
This is a great book! This book is also incredible. It describes the mood of the nation between 9/11 and the economic meltdown. At the same time it is revealing that things weren't so great before 9/11. Our problems were in the making for a few decades. It gives an excellent description of our political climate and it is compared with other totalitarian regimes of the past despite the fact that we are not there yet.
The book is written in a simple journalistic way, the authors are journalists. It's relatively short and very worthwhile for the price.
from earth
While espouseing one thing the opposite comes out. As a protaganist in the first segment is a
sofisticated, and obviously spoiled child who cant seem to understand that anarchy is not the
thing to push in West Virginia. Its not about Freedom of speech. Its about being stupid.
I despise the writers intent to try and white wash a hatred of the US by purported love of the US.
Ok, I admit it, I am a conservative Libertarian. And yes, freedom of speech is fine and dandy.
But the founders also knew that if you used it unwisely it could and would come back and bite
you on the butt. When they wrote the 1st amendment, if you used it and were called on that usage,
a duel might be in order. And you might pay for that unwise usage with your very life. "Thems fighting
words" comes to mind.
Snowseeker
Dale Maharidge and Michael Williamson's "Homeland" is the best book of 2004, and one of the most important nonfiction works ever published about the United States.

Maharidge travels through the United States observing the ways in which the attacks of 9/11/2001 have changed America and Americans. Many of these changes are obvious, but others are more subtle. With the seasoned eye of a trained reporter, Maharidge picks up on these changes and analyzes them with an amazing degree of insight. His conversations with ordinary Americans around the country reveal the different ways -- many of them downright scary -- in which the USA has changed over the last few years.

Much of the book deals with neo-McCarthyism and the distressing willingness of many Americans to give up their constitutionally-protected freedoms after 9/11. Maharidge chronicles many recent attacks on the Bill of Rights by local governments, the federal government, and "concerned citizens" alike. He also details the ways in which the 9/11 attacks fueled the latent racism that many Americans feel toward Muslims, resulting in tragedies like the white mob that attacked a Chicago-area mosque on the evening after the attacks.

Maharidge makes no secret of his left-wing perspective, but that doesn't mean this book is a political tract. On the contrary, he bends over backwards to be fair and non-judgmental toward the people he interviews, even when he's talking with white supremacists and other unsavory characters. Maharidge has his own opinion, but thankfully, he also has a genuine desire to understand events from the perspective of those who differ from him politically.

Michael Williamson's photographs are also superb, as usual. Whether it's a telling shot of weary workers riding home in a subway car, or a shot of racist white motel owners trumpeting that their establishment is "owned by Americans," Williamson's photos poignantly capture the America that exists today.

This book takes you to places where the places mainstream media refuses to go, and covers issues that most so-called "reporters" would never touch with a 10-foot pole. With the 2004 election coming up, now is the most important time for Americans to understand and act upon the issues Maharidge discusses in this book. Do yourself a favor: If you read only one book this year, make it this one. Few more important works have ever been published.
Laizel
When I picked up this book I was intrigued with his concept of a journey across the country to document the changes in American consciousness since 9/11.
I was startled and enthused as Maharidge uncovered the underpinnings of various and diverse, highly charged, emotional crosscurrents affecting the nation.
His dedication begins, "To the U.S. Constitution and the Bill of Rights . . ." So it is no surprise that parts of the book focus on the repression of opinions differing from mainstream conservative. Many accounts cover intimidation and lost jobs. But Maharidge doesn't stop there; he searches out and interviews both sides for their stories, which underneath have common threads.
Maharidge digs deeper than the surface tensions of neo-conservatives versus liberals, to address the economic crisis that has been building in the country for the last 30 years; the emotions of which, September 11 catalyzed to the surface in deeply divided positions in America.
The book is full of information, and reveals more controversial actions taken by the current administration after 9/11, such as the destroying of gun purchase records, (supported by the NRA) after the FBI had begun to find correlations to terrorists in the records.
He sets to rights such misquotes as, "my country, right or wrong." The correct quote, actually spoken by Carl Schurz, a U. S. Senator in 1899, goes: "Our country, right or wrong. When right, to be kept right; when wrong, to be put right."
In the last part of the book, Maharidge points out some parallels between the U.S. today, and W.W.II Germany, and actions taken by Hitler. While there are some similarities, he says the comparison is by no means exact, but it is worth taking note of.
All in all an engrossing and educational read that peels back the layers of extremism dividing the country, to expose common struggles and concerns.