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e-Book Mother-Work: Women, Child Welfare, and the State, 1890-1930 (Women in American History) epub download

e-Book Mother-Work: Women, Child Welfare, and the State, 1890-1930 (Women in American History) epub download

Author: Molly Ladd-Taylor
ISBN: 0252020448
Pages: 211 pages
Publisher: University of Illinois Press (January 1, 1994)
Language: English
Category: Politics & Government
Size ePUB: 1770 kb
Size Fb2: 1731 kb
Size DJVU: 1212 kb
Rating: 4.9
Votes: 417
Format: lrf mbr mbr txt
Subcategory: Politics

e-Book Mother-Work: Women, Child Welfare, and the State, 1890-1930 (Women in American History) epub download

by Molly Ladd-Taylor



In turn, the advent of these services altered mothering experiences in a number of ways, including by reducing the infant mortality rate

Mother-work, defined as "women's unpaid work of reproduction and caregiving", was the motivation behind . Women played the central role in this development.

Mother-work, defined as "women's unpaid work of reproduction and caregiving", was the motivation behind women's public activism and "maternalist" ideology. In Mother-Work, Molly Ladd-Taylor explores both the private and public aspects of childrearing, using the direct relationship between them to shed new light on the histories of motherhood, the welfare state, and women's activism in the United States. Mother-work, defined as "women's unpaid work of reproduction and caregiving", was the motivation behind women's public activism and "maternalist" ideology.

by. Ladd-Taylor, Molly, 1955-. urn:acs6:dd:pdf:ff7-6f584ac7c086 urn:acs6:dd:epub:11a-12666848e1f4 urn:oclc:record:1036802342. University of Toronto.

In Mother-Work, Molly Ladd-Taylor explores both the private and public aspects of child-rearing, using the relationship between them to cast new light on the histories of motherhood, the welfare state, and women's activism in the United Early in the twentieth century, maternal and child welfare evolved from a private family responsibility into a matter of national policy.

In Mother-Work, Molly Ladd-Taylor explores both the private and public aspects of child-rearing, using . previous book next book. To Live Here, You Have to Fight.

In Mother-Work, Molly Ladd-Taylor explores both the private and public aspects of child-rearing, using the relationship between them to cast new light on the histories of motherhood, the welfare state, and women's activism in the United States. She argues that mother-work, "women's unpaid work of reproduction and caregiving," motivated women's public activism and "maternalist" ideology.

Mother - Work: Women, Child Welfare and the State, 1890 - 1930Molly .

This interesting and well - written book explores the intersection between personal and public politics, between women's reproductive work and social activism.

Woloch, Women and the American Experience, 28. WE have been accustomed for many generations to think of woman's place a. . She is the author of numerous articles on the history of American social welfare and is currently working on a biography of Julia Lathrop, forthcoming from Westview Press. Jane Addams, speech, 1908. WE have been accustomed for many generations to think of woman's place as being entirely within the walls of her own household, and it is indeed impossible to imagine the time when her duty there shall be ended or to forecast any social change which shall ever release her from that paramount obligation.

Southwest Missouri State University. Recommend this journal. Published online by Cambridge University Press: 24 February 2017. History of Education Quarterly.

Black Neighbors: Race and the Limits of Reform in the American Settlement House Movement, 1890-1945. Women and Social Policies in Europe: Work, Family and the State. Elisabeth Lasch-Quinn. Surrogates and Other Mothers: The Debates over Assisted Reproduction. Birth Control Politics in the United States, 1916-1945. Family, Dependence, and the Origins of the Welfare State: Britain and France, 1914-1945. Love and Toil: Motherhood in Outcast London, 1870-1918.

Early in the twentieth century, maternal and child welfare evolved from a private family responsibility into a matter of national policy. Women played the central role in this development. In Mother-Work, Molly Ladd-Taylor explores both the private and public aspects of childrearing, using the direct relationship between them to shed new light on the histories of motherhood, the welfare state, and women's activism in the United States.Mother-work, defined as "women's unpaid work of reproduction and caregiving," was the motivation behind women's public activism and "maternalist" ideology. Ladd-Taylor emphasizes the connection between mother-work and social welfare politics by showing that their mothering experiences led women to become active in the development of public health, education, and welfare services. In turn, the advent of these services altered mothering experiences in a number of ways, including by reducing the infant mortality rate.By examining women's activism in organizations including the National Congress of Mothers and Parent-Teacher Associations, the U.S. Children's Bureau, and the National Woman's Party, Ladd-Taylor dispels the notion of "mother-work" as a contradictory term and clarifies women's role in the development of the American economic system.