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e-Book Orphaned: One Woman's Mission to Save Africa's AIDS Children epub download

e-Book Orphaned: One Woman's Mission to Save Africa's AIDS Children epub download

Author: Melissa Fay Greene
ISBN: 0747585423
Pages: 480 pages
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing PLC; First Edition edition (September 4, 2007)
Language: English
Category: Politics & Government
Size ePUB: 1435 kb
Size Fb2: 1480 kb
Size DJVU: 1707 kb
Rating: 4.4
Votes: 722
Format: mobi lit docx azw
Subcategory: Politics

e-Book Orphaned: One Woman's Mission to Save Africa's AIDS Children epub download

by Melissa Fay Greene



Orphaned - Melissa Fay Greene. A humble and pretty young woman, wearing a long skirt, seated herself on a low stool to roast fresh coffee beans.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. Orphaned - Melissa Fay Greene. She shook them in an iron skillet over a portable stove.

Электронная книга "There is No Me Without You: One Woman's Odyssey to Rescue Africa's Children", Melissa Fay Greene

Электронная книга "There is No Me Without You: One Woman's Odyssey to Rescue Africa's Children", Melissa Fay Greene. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "There is No Me Without You: One Woman's Odyssey to Rescue Africa's Children" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Melissa Fay Greene (born December 30, 1952) is an American nonfiction author. A 1975 graduate of Oberlin College, Greene is the author of six books of nonfiction, a two-time National Book Award finalist, a 2011 inductee into the Georgia Writers Hall of Fame, and a 2015 recipient of the John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship in the Creative Arts.

Melissa Fay Greene is the highly acclaimed author of Praying for Sheetrock, The Temple Bombing (both shortlisted for a National Book Award) and Last Man Out. Sheetrock was included in the 'J' list, compiled by New York University, of the top 100 works of journalism in the 20th century. Greene's December 2002 New York Times magazine article on the plight of the AIDS orphans inspired scores of adoptions and an outpouring of financial support for African orphanages and clinics.

Greene is an excellent writer, After reading Melissa Fay Greene's funny No Biking in the House Without a Helmet, I picked up this earlier book about the woman who runs the orphanage from which some of Green's children came

Greene is an excellent writer, After reading Melissa Fay Greene's funny No Biking in the House Without a Helmet, I picked up this earlier book about the woman who runs the orphanage from which some of Green's children came. Somehow I missed it when it came out, despite its winning a slew of awards that year. It is a powerful book, and it took me a long time to finish it because I needed time to absorb its impact. The book is not maudlin nor manipulative, but its subject, AIDS orphans, is tragic.

Place of Publication. Trending price is based on prices over last 90 days. Melissa Fay Greene is the highly acclaimed author of Praying for Sheetrock, The Temple Bombing (both shortlisted for a National Book Award) and Last Man Out. Sheetrock was included in the J list, compiled by New York University, of the top one hundred works of journalism in the 20th century. Current slide {CURRENT SLIDE} of {TOTAL SLIDES}- Save on Non Fiction. The Secret Rhonda Byrne.

At heart, this book is about children and the parents they need to care for .

At heart, this book is about children and the parents they need to care for them. More than 13 million children have been orphaned by AIDS in Africa; UNAIDS (the Joint United Nations Program on HIV/AIDS) predicts that by 2010 25-50 million African children under the age of 15 will be orphaned; in a dozen African countries, up to a quarter of the nation's children will be orphans.

In a tin-walled compound outside Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, a middle-class woman named Haregewoin Teferra suffers terrible personal losses. In grief, she turns to the church, and is presented with two orphans and asked to house them. Haregewoin agrees. Once she opens her gate, she never manages to close it again. Here is a woman who does not run away from HIV-positive and AIDS-orphaned children, brought to her on foot, by bus or by donkey cart. There are over a million AIDS orphans in Ethiopia; "There Is No Me Without You" tells a few of their remarkable stories through the eyes of a woman whose own life has been altered by them.
Alsath
I experienced several starts and stops with this book--not because it's poorly written or dull, but because it's very sad. The relationship between how sad I find a book and how many times I have to put it down to check on my sleeping children is a directly proportional one. I checked on my children a lot while reading this book, watching their little backs rise and fall and counting their laborious REM-sleep breaths to make sure all was well with them. I remember, as a kid, rolling my eyes at my own mother when she would wince, gasp and recoil at the sight of something tragic happening to a child on TV. Then I had kids of my own, and I've since apologized for my cavalier attitude. I winced and gasped and recoiled a lot while reading this book--then checked on my sleeping kids.

There Is No Me Without You accomplishes a lot. It primarily tells the story of Haregewoin Teferra, a Christian Ethiopian woman who, in order to cope with the loss of her husband and eldest daughter, started a make-shift, grass-roots orphanage for stigmatized AIDS orphans in her hometown, Addis Ababa. Intertwined with Haregwoin's amazing story is a history of the HIV/AIDS epidemic, its origins and impact. In telling the story, Melissa Fay Greene does so many things right. She resists deifying her subject, presenting Haregewoin's flaws alongside her virtues, which results in a nuanced, credible and moving profile. She also creates an imagery-rich picture of Addis Ababa in all its colorful, raucous and dusty splendor. I feel almost like I've been there after reading this book.

I only had two problems with the book--the first is a matter of craft and the second a matter of argumentation.

Greene writes with a lot of feeling, which is one of the many reasons this book is so engaging. But, in describing many scenes where she herself was not present, she steps into the role of a third-person omniscient narrator, often detailing with great flourish the thoughts and emotions of children in tragic situations. There were times when her writing felt a bit audacious, and I found myself asking, how can you claim to know what this child felt and thought as he was being ripped from his dying mother's arms? I'm sure she conducted extensive interviews with the children, but I did feel like she encroached inappropriately on their emotional landscapes at times, giving them thoughts and feelings that were, perhaps, not their own.

My second concern is regarding her argumentation.

In discussing the history of HIV/AIDS, she does not take a neutral stance. Her argument is very moral and often very persuasive. She rightly condemns the ignorance, indifference and greed of Western governments and pharmaceutical companies for the ways in which they stood back and watched, or looked away, while HIV spread rapidly in marginalized and third-world communities. She also condemns the religious, conservative moralizers and their insistence on prevention rather than treatment. She makes a few really good claims, and I appreciate what I learned from her. But, the problem with her argument in my eyes is this: in order to distance herself from people like Jerry Falwell who believe that God engineered HIV as a unique punishment for homosexuals (and who can blame her for wanting to do that?), she completely ignores the fact that so many of the suffering women and children she profiles contracted the virus because of the moral failings of men in their communities. Greene writes as though rape, sexual exploitation and marital infidelity are sad inevitabilities not worth discussing. Acknowledging these elephants in the room does not mean that we ignore treatment options for those already infected with HIV, and it does not mean we assume that everyone contracted the virus these ways. But, we can't ignore the gross gender inequality and violence against women and girls that is facilitating the spread of HIV in the third world, particularly Africa.

Just recently I read a BBC article that addressed the alarming HIV rate among girls in South Africa. The article states that "at least 28% of South African schoolgirls are HIV positive compared with 4% of boys because `sugar daddies' are exploiting them." 28%! Authors Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn explain the "sugar daddy" culture in their book Half the Sky: "In South Africa, successfully middle-aged men often keep young teenage girls as mistresses, and many teenagers see such `sugar daddies' as a ladder to a better life" (139).

Also discussed in Half the Sky is the pervasive culture of rape that plagues many African nations:

"In Darfur, it gradually became clear that the Sudanese-sponsored Janjaweed militias were seeking out and gang-raping women of three African tribes, cutting of their ears or otherwise mutilating them to mark them forever as rape victims...Sudan also blocked aid groups from bringing into Darfur postexposure prophylaxis kits, which can greatly reduce the risk that a rape victim will be infected with HIV" (83).

"Mass rapes have been reported at stunning levels in recent conflicts. Half of women in Sierra Leone endured sexual violence or the threat of it during the upheavals in that country, and a United Nations report claims that 90 percent of girls and women over the age of three were sexually abused in part of Liberia during the civil war there" (83).

Out of the Congo are numerous reports of rape being used as a tool of war.

And regarding HIV and marital infidelity: "Routinely in Africa and Asia, women stay safe until they are married, and then they contract AIDS from their husbands" (138).

There is a scene in There Is No Me Without You where the author listens to a man tell the story of his family, particularly the death of his wife. When the man alludes to the marital infidelity that infected him, and subsequently his wife, with HIV, Greene seems to pride herself in mentioning that none of the listeners, herself included, judged him at that moment. I'm not suggesting that he be scorned or spit upon, or treated meanly and without compassion. I'm not suggesting that he be left to think on his sins and languish in some trash-infested alley without treatment. I'm not suggesting that these problems are unique to Africa or even that we need to focus all of our attention on sexual ethics when it comes to the spread of HIV/AIDS. But, it does trouble me to consider the reality that if little white girls were being made into sexual baubles by older white men, and if white women were routinely contracting HIV from their unfaithful husbands, you wouldn't be able to hear yourself think over the cacophony of outrage. So, why is it that Greene, whose wrath burns against Western leaders and pharmaceutical companies, is incapable of arousing even a modicum of judgment for this poor man who brought ruin, even if inadvertently, to his entire family? Is it compassion and a spirit of equality that motivates her? Or is it a more subtle and insidious form of racism, the kind that, for fear of being politically-incorrect, refuses to view this man as a moral equal, a moral agent who was capable of being a better husband to his wife and a better father to his children, but chose not to? God help us if we continue to view rape, sexual exploitation and marital infidelity as sad inevitabilities, and God help us if we continue to view Africans as people who don't know any better.
Hatе&love
This book is two stories side-by-side. One story is the very intimate portrayal of a woman who accidentally created an orphanage and found herself, for better or worse, knee-deep in an exploding and unrecognized crisis in Ethiopia. Things didn't always go well but she did the best she could with the tools she had and ultimately impacted the lives of many children (and adoptive parents!). The second story is the story of AIDS in Africa and the world's reaction to the crisis, and I guarantee that unless you have extensively studied on that subject you will be surprised and dismayed at what you learn. Definitely a must-read for every socially conscious human.
LØV€ YØỮ
Based on reviews, I expected a good book about a noble woman who altruistically takes care of AIDS orphans. Yes, it's that, but there was so much more depth and insight, and vastly superior writing than I had expected. This is not a hagiography. The author tells the story of this woman interspersed with information about AIDS (theories as to its origins, epidemiology statistics, the history of the development of medicines and their patents), and stories of families who've adopted Ethiopian orphans. She personalizes a catastrophe. She could inspire someone with no interest in small children (me) to (almost) want to adopt an orphan.

What was most superb was how this story of this woman encompasses the strange turns lives can take. The Ethiopian woman, Haregewoin, didn't wake up one day and decide to open an orphanage. She was ready to effectively end her life due to grief over her daughter's death when a priest asked her to take care of one orphan, and that gave her a raison d'etre. This escalates into running a large orphanage and being pivotal in foreign adoptions. There are unexpected twists, even scandals, and an illustration of how no good deed goes unpunished. This story encapsulates the Internet's upside (intercontinental communication), and downside (misinformation spread so repetitively that it appears to be true). The most fascinating chapter was about Haregewoin's trip to the U.S. The most touching chapter was about an American couple taking their newly adopted two children to their birth village so they could see their grandfather before they left Ethiopia.

After reading this, I find myself trying to picture 10% of everyone I know dying of AIDS. And having seven-year old girls taking care of their younger siblings, and having our best hope be that someone from China or Nigeria will swoop in to take the children off the sinking ship. That's very hard to picture, but that's the scenario depicted by this book.