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e-Book Revolt Against Modernity: Leo Strauss, Eric Voegelin, and the Search for a Postliberal Order epub download

e-Book Revolt Against Modernity: Leo Strauss, Eric Voegelin, and the Search for a Postliberal Order epub download

Author: Ted V. McAllister
ISBN: 0700608737
Pages: 340 pages
Publisher: University Press of Kansas (January 22, 1996)
Language: English
Category: Politics & Government
Size ePUB: 1422 kb
Size Fb2: 1359 kb
Size DJVU: 1548 kb
Rating: 4.4
Votes: 764
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Subcategory: Politics

e-Book Revolt Against Modernity: Leo Strauss, Eric Voegelin, and the Search for a Postliberal Order epub download

by Ted V. McAllister



Eric Voegelin and Leo Strauss are two of the most provocative and durable political philosophers of this century.

Eric Voegelin and Leo Strauss are two of the most provocative and durable political philosophers of this century. Ted McAllister's superbly written study provides the first comprehensive comparison of their thought and its profound influence on contemporary American conservatism.

la science politique, Voegelin, Eric, Liberalism United States, Voegelin, Eric, (1901-1985) - Contribution a la science politique, Strauss, Leo, (1899-1973) . Books for People with Print Disabilities.

la science politique, Voegelin, Eric, Liberalism United States, Voegelin, Eric, (1901-1985) - Contribution a la science politique, Strauss, Leo, (1899-1973) - Contribution a la science politique, Idees politiques - Etats-Unis - Histoire, Liberalisme - Etats-Unis, Conservatisme - Etats-Unis. Trent University Library Donation. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by station10. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

Revolt Against Modernity book.

Ted Vernon Mcallister. In the 1950s a conservative intellectual movement emerged in the United States complete with a sense of continuity with past conservatives and with a heightened fear of the unprecedented danger posed by the hegemony of liberals and. In the 1950s a conservative intellectual movement emerged in the United States complete with a sense of continuity with past conservatives and with a heightened fear of the unprecedented danger posed by the hegemony of liberals and liberal ideals. Two European emigres, both refugees from Hitler's Europe, became the philosophers for this movement. Eric Voegelin and Leo Strauss brought to the American right the concerns and fears of continental philosophers.

December 18, 2019Higher Education, John Henry Newman, Pierre Manent. The Countercultural Idea of a Christian University. Statue of John Witherspoon, Princeton University (Jay Yuan/Shutterstock. The next great Christian university will oppose the combination of modernism and cultural ideology now regnant in the academy.

book by Ted V. McAllister. This study provides a comparison of the political philosophy of Eric Voegelin and Leo Strauss, and its influence on contemporary American conservatism. Part of the American Political Thought Series). by Ted V.

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By Ted V. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 1996. Steven R. McCarl (a1). University of Denver.

Ted McAllister is Edward L. Gaylord Chair and associate professor of public policy at Pepperdine University. Engage on social media. Nothing in this journal, whether in print or pixels, is an attempt to aid or hinder the passage of any bill or influence the election of any candidate. Designed by Beck & Stone.

Eric Voegelin and Leo Strauss are two of the most provocative and durable political philosophers of this century. Ted McAllister's superbly written study provides the first comprehensive comparison of their thought and its profound influence on contemporary American conservatism.Since the appearance in the 1950s of Strauss's Natural Right and History and Voegelin's Order and History, conservatives like Russell Kirk, Irving Kristol, and Allan Bloom have increasingly turned to these thinkers to support their attacks on liberalism and the modernist mindset.Like so many conservatives, Strauss and Voegelin rebelled against modernity' amorality—personified by Machiavelli, Hobbes, Rousseau, Kant, Hegel, and Nietzsche—and its promotion of individualism and materialism over communal and spiritual responsibility. While both disdained the reductionist "conservative" label, conservatives nevertheless appropriated their philosophy, in part because it restored theology and classical tradition to the moral core of civil society.For both men, modernity's debilitating disorder revealed surprising and disturbing relations among liberal, communist, and Nazi ideologies. In their eyes, modernity's insidious virus, so apparent in the Nazi and communist regimes, lies incubating within liberal democracy itself.McAllister's thorough reevaluation of Strauss and Voegelin expands our understanding of their thought and restores balance to a literature that has been dominated by political theorists and disciples of Strauss and Voegelin. Neither reverential nor dismissive, he reveals the social, historical, political, and philosophical foundations of their work and effectively decodes their frequently opaque or esoteric thinking.Well written and persuasively argued, McAllister's study will appeal to anyone engaged in the volatile debates over liberalism's demise and conservatism's rise.
Thetalen
After reading Strauss's Natural Right and History -- enjoying much of it, stunned by his seeming distaste for any modern philosophy, and confused by much of it -- and after discovering Voegelin's Anamnesis as a political science watershed -- I felt fortunate to find McAllister's Revolt Against Modernity. This compare-and-contrast approach to these twentieth-century, first-generation Americans is very helpful. McAllister's prose is approachable, almost conversational, and his footnotes are thorough and often enlightening.
Malaunitly
I met this author at an ISI conference in Providence, RI., that focused on the state of higher education in the United States. I was so impressed by his presentation-- its clarity, insight, and delivery -- that I had to order this book, which I read in a matter of two days. This book is a must read for many reasons. First, it's deep, insightful, and wonderfully written. It is not ideological but profound. It takes the reader through Strauss' and Voegelin's main concerns within the context of liberalism's failure to satisfy the soul's natural longing for noble order of which it is a part. Second, both Strauss and Vogelin are very difficult to grasp. Rather than imposing labels and distorting formulations on to their thought, McAllister carefully illuminates the core of their ideas while avoiding sectarian battles and academic jargon, which is always a mark of a weak mind. I cannot recommend this book more highly. You will not be disappointed.
Ricep
Ted McAllister’s Revolt Against Modernity is a highly rewarding read. The book is primarily intended for a traditionalist conservative (paleocon) audience, though any reader interested in Leo Strauss or Eric Voegelin will find good general presentations of their teachings here, along with useful and illuminating comparisons and contrasts between these two thinkers. McAllister argues that Strauss and Voegelin, though not traditionalist conservatives, have provided traditionalist conservatives with essential philosophic critiques of the modern age, and helpful-though by no means sufficient-responses to the modern “crisis.” McAllister comes across as highly appreciative of both figures, and forms this balanced judgment: “If Strauss offered a more powerful diagnosis, Voegelin offered a more powerful cure.” (p. 176).

Strauss and Voegelin provide different, though complementary accounts of modern declension. They agree that modern thought severely and illegitimately restricts what is deemed knowable, thereby obscuring that we are part of a larger order not of our own devising. This has unleashed a Pandora’s box of problems. Both thinkers also stress that knowledge was merely a secondary, facilitating goal of the Enlightenment, freedom (power, will, creativity) rested at its center. McAllister finds both declension tales useful, but considers Strauss the greatest conservative critic of modernity. “Voegelin emphasized the willful heart that sought freedom through knowledge…Strauss more accurately emphasized the power of the triumph of will over knowledge that has come to characterize the contemporary late modern era.” (p. 133)

Since modernity involves a contraction of the metaphysical horizon, McAllister deems the “mystic” Voegelin as presenting a powerful antidote. Through his “philosophy of consciousness,” Voegelin provides much more adequate treatment of religion and philosophy than does Strauss, who offers a somewhat truncated view of philosophy, and who, unlike Voegelin, insists on a complete separation of philosophy and religion. So, Voegelin offers a much richer articulation of metaphysical Order for his readers than does Strauss. Another point in Voeglin’s favor from a traditionalist conservative point of view is that Voegelin offers a positive evaluation of Christianity, whereas Strauss views it in a more problematic light.

McAllister also paradoxically notes that Voegelin’s rich articulation of philosophical and religious symbolism is actually in some sense a weakness, and that Strauss’s relatively truncated presentation of philosophy (which not only is divorced from religion but which does not take traditional ontology seriously) is in some sense a strength. Voegelin’s mystical “God-talk” cuts against the modern-grain; in comparison, Strauss’s "skeptical" interpretation of philosophy is more accessible to modern sensibilities, which is one reason Strauss is better known and read than Voegelin.

Though Strauss’s work is constructed so as not to conflict too overwhelmingly with contemporary intellectual prejudices, it is capable of sweeping the reader away from the here and now, and McAllister does his best to tease out the implications and the profundity of Strauss’s view of philosophy. Near the end of the chapter devoted exclusively to Strauss, and that attempts to fit all the puzzle pieces together, McAllister quotes Strauss from The City And Man concerning “the all important question which is coeval with philosophy although the philosophers do not frequently pronounce it-the question quid sit deus.” (p. 217-18) (“What is God?” in translation.) Apparently, the skepticism of Strauss's philosopher turns out somehow ultimately to be something more. And speaking of God, though McAllister certainly stresses that Strauss treated religion as intellectually defensible and with genuine respect, he did not mention a further point: some who have found Strauss’s Athens vs. Jerusalem tension compelling have opted for religion over philosophy.

At the end of the book, McAllister cedes the conservative label to the ascendant neocons and argues that in today’s (mid-1990’s) inhospitable environment the traditionalist conservatives have no choice but to become reactionaries. Though he acknowledges Strauss’s huge impact on the neocons (and helps the reader to understand it), McAllister thinks that the work of Strauss as well as Voegelin-whom the paleocons have always admired-will become even more important to the paleocons over time. Together they offer a turbulent world a defense of Order, both intellectually and politically speaking.

Revolt Against Modernity gets high marks for its capable treatment of Strauss and Voegelin. McAllister obviously absorbed himself in the writings of these men he finds so compelling. To me, a distinctive aspect of his treatment of Strauss is the emphasis he places on Strauss’s alleged yearning for a return to the political/cultural conditions of Maimonides and Alfarabi. Like many other accounts of Strauss, McAllister’s acknowledges Strauss’s appreciation of liberal democracy and his attempt to strengthen it against internal corrosion, but one gets the sense that for McAllister’s Strauss, liberal democracy was ultimately unworkable. As for Voegelin, since my prior exposure has consisted merely in reading The New Science Of Politics, McAllister’s text gave me a better grasp of Voegelin’s views, particularly his “philosophy of consciousness.” I definitely intent to explore more Voegelin in the future, both primary and secondary sources.

It should be mentioned that in the almost 20 years since McAllister penned this book, the paleocons have become more hostile rather than more receptive to Strauss. For instance, Paul Gottfried and Grant Havers have recently written highly learned and articulate critiques of Strauss from the Right. So, readers interested in assessing McAllister's positive evaluation of Strauss’s work from a traditionalist conservative frame of reference should be aware that there are other opinions out there to consult.
skyjettttt
McAllister really seems to understand Strauss, which is more than can be said about many who write about Strauss (scholars and otherwise). This will serve as a useful antidote. And of course, Voegelin has long been neglected, so any work treating him seriously is a welcome addition. This should be in the library of serious political theorists.
kewdiepie
In having Dr. Ted V. McAllister as my Western and American Heritage Professor at Hillsdale College,I was able to fully appreciate his historical views on a personal basis. His knowledge of Niccolo Machiavelli and modernity, and the philosophy of Plato relating to Western history is unparalled. His views in his book are presented in a true and indepth fashion. After being his student for two semesters, I will truely miss his insight and knowledge pertaining to historical matters.