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e-Book The Presumed Alliance: The Unspoken Conflict Between Latinos and Blacks and What It Means for America epub download

e-Book The Presumed Alliance: The Unspoken Conflict Between Latinos and Blacks and What It Means for America epub download

Author: Nicolas C. Vaca PhD
ISBN: 0060522054
Pages: 256 pages
Publisher: HarperCollins; Reprint edition (August 17, 2004)
Language: English
Category: Social Sciences
Size ePUB: 1629 kb
Size Fb2: 1657 kb
Size DJVU: 1326 kb
Rating: 4.8
Votes: 521
Format: azw lit lrf mbr
Subcategory: Politics

e-Book The Presumed Alliance: The Unspoken Conflict Between Latinos and Blacks and What It Means for America epub download

by Nicolas C. Vaca PhD



by Nicolas C. Vaca PhD (Author).

by Nicolas C. The question of Black-Latino (and even Asian) political alliance is extremely important as we head closer and closer to a population in which 'White' is no longer the dominant category (and, believe me, I understand the race v. ethnicity argument, but we have to face the fact that for many Latinos, the very terms associated with them have become racialized). Minority Politics' has too often seeemed to be a monolithic term, when in fact tensions have always existed between the groups that comprise it. Mr. Vaca points to these tensions, and expounds upon them with examples.

The Presumed Alliance: The Unspoken Conflict Between Latinos and Blacks and What It Means for .

The Presumed Alliance: The Unspoken Conflict Between Latinos and Blacks and What It Means for America. More than simply unveiling the problem, The Presumed Alliance offers optimistic solutions to the future relations between Latino and Black America. Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere.

Indeed, as the number of Latinos has increased dramatically over the last ten years, competition over power and resources between these two groups has led to surprisingly antagonistic and uncooperative interactions.

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Includes bibliographical references and index. 1. The Latino tsunami : the browning of America - 2. Somewhere over the rainbow coalition : the zero-sum game and Black-Latino conflict - 3. Who's the leader of the civil rights band? : Latino's role in Brown v. Education - 4. The folly of presumption : Black voters and the Los Angeles 2001 mayoral election - 5. Passed by and shut out : Blacks trapped in Miami's Latino vortex - 6. When Blacks rule : lesson from Compton - 7. Houston, we have a problem : Latinos abandon party loyalty to vote for one.

The Presumed Alliance NPR coverage of The Presumed Alliance: The Unspoken .

The Presumed Alliance NPR coverage of The Presumed Alliance: The Unspoken Conflict Between Latinos and Blacks and What It Means for America by Nicolas C. Vaca. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more. The Presumed Alliance. Addresses controversial issues surrounding the complex and sometimes confrontational relationship between African-Americans and Latin-Americans, challenging assumptions that the two groups are natural political allies while offering insight into how communities can benefit from mutually beneficial agendas.

So he has: The Presumed Alliance: The Unspoken Conflict Between Latinos and Blacks and What It Means for America. Vaca recounts some fairly well-known tales: for example, how in Los Angeles in 2001, South Central blacks teamed up with San Fernando Valley white conservatives to defeat Antonio Villaraigosa's bid to become the first Mexican mayor since LA was a dusty pueblo.

As Latino and African Americans increasingly live side by side in large urban centers, as well as in suburban clusters, the idealized concept of a "Rainbow Coalition" would suggest that these two disenfranchised groups are natural political allies. Indeed, as the number of Latinos has increased dramatically over the last ten years, competition over power and resources between these two groups has led to surprisingly antagonistic and uncooperative interactions. Many African Americans now view Latinos, because of their growth in numbers, as a threat to their social, economic, and political gains.

Vaca debunks the myth of "The Great Union" and offers the hope he believes each community could learn from, in order to achieve a mutually agreed upon agenda. More than simply unveiling the problem, The Presumed Alliance offers optimistic solutions to the future relations between Latino and Black America.

Error parents
enlightning.
Lo◘Ve
I will read this book completely and hold out judgement there, but it does appear to highlight particular occurences I have seen.
Hasirri
Very interesting and disappointing examples of the cultural relationship starting to take places in our society.
Hurus
This is the story behind the "other" civil rights struggle in modern America. The title comes from the presumption that many people have that blacks and latinos share much of the same history of segregation and civil rights suppression and that, therefore, they are "presumed" to be allies in the struggle for full citizenship. To the contrary, there are many differences in their historical struggles and currently blacks and hispanics see themselves engaged in a zero-sum conflict where any gains one group makes must be at a cost to the other. In fact, the message is loud and clear enough that it makes me wonder how much of the current immigration reform is being instigated by African-Americans.

Of course, hispanic occupation in this country existed before America even existed. For a couple hundred years whites were the aliens on the west coast, not the hispanics. There is a reason so much of California is named in Spanish terms. The hispanic people did not suddenly move south of the border after the treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo was signed February 2, 1848, ending the Mexican-American War. In fact hispanic residents of what is now western United States were given automatic American citizenship if they so desired. Later, labor for farms and the building of railroads was welcomed, encouraged, even recruited from Mexico. Although many workers returned home after the harvest or the completion of the railroad, even more stayed. They continue to cross the border in search of a job and a better life. Farmers and construction contractors plead with the U.S. government to turn a blind eye to the immigration problem as cheap labor is needed to stay competitive. Many Americans would rather take welfare than the jobs offered to the Chicanos. About every 10 years lately, we've offered amnesty to those already in the country and attempted to stem the flow. All it seems to do is encourage more illegal immigration by those who hope that 10 or 20 years down the road another amnesty will be approved.

Vaca describes the segregation that occured in the American Southwest in the early 1900's, segregation as bad as anything in the South against blacks, and the legal battles that set the stage for tearing down the "separate but equal" doctrine in segregated education. He also describes racial tension with blacks where the black population seems to be saying, "We fought long and hard for a place in society and we're not about to give it up." For example, although blacks make up about 10% of the Los Angeles population, they account for 37% of city and county employees. The numbers are almost exactly reversed for hispanics. And Vaca asks how we can balance this without there being some loss to the black community. He also points out that the hispanic population are not yet politically connected. Many, of course, are not citizens and can therefore not vote. Of those who could vote, registration and actual voting rates are even lower than whites. Vaca claims they do not generally vote as a bloc unless they feel disenfranchised.

Hispanics, even 2nd and 3rd generation American hispanics, have a cultural bond with current hispanic immigrants - both legal and illegal. Recent demonstrations throughout the country have made that clear. They don't have the attitude of "now that I'm here let's pull up the drawbridge and shut the gates". Part of it is political as they are certainly a population to be reckoned with but the other part is a desire to share the American dream. Presumed Alliance is an excellent book to provide a solid background for the current immigration debate as well as dicussions we will certainly be having in the future to cope with the growth of the hispanic American population.
Blackredeemer
California lawyer Nicolas C. Vaca got his start as an ethnic activist by listening to Malcolm X lecture at Berkeley in 1963.
But by the end of the 1960s, Vaca had discovered that, in the civil rights struggle, all minorities are equal, but one minority is more equal than others:
"Before arriving in Washington I expected to encounter other Mexican Americans at the [U.S. Commission on Civil Rights], but I discovered that I, a summer intern, was the highest ranking Mexican American there."
Eventually, more Latinos elbowed their way into the lucrative business of being professional minorities. But they found that the dominant blacks weren't willing to allow them places at the table in proportion to their burgeoning numbers.
Vaca became fascinated by how the black-Latino political conflicts that he saw all around him were swept under the rug in the media:
"For years I discussed these issues with close friends and fellow attorneys-Anglo, Latino, and Black-as I waited for a book to appear that would address the conflict or at least go beyond pat analyses like 'Interethnic conflict can exist, but it is believed that there is more of a basis for cooperation than there is for conflict'-and then drop the subject."
He eventually realized he would have to write the book himself. So he has: The Presumed Alliance: The Unspoken Conflict Between Latinos and Blacks and What It Means for America.
Vaca recounts some fairly well-known tales: for example, how in Los Angeles in 2001, South Central blacks teamed up with San Fernando Valley white conservatives to defeat Antonio Villaraigosa's bid to become the first Mexican mayor since LA was a dusty pueblo. He also gives the once-over to the convoluted story of how Fernando Ferrer's attempt to win the 2001 Democratic mayoral primary in New York City with a Latino-black coalition foundered upon his protracted and frustrating courtship of Al Sharpton.
More interesting are the fresher stories-about how baldly Hispanics in Miami disdain blacks; and how dismissively the black ruling class in Compton, just outside of L.A., treats that suburb's Chicano majority.
As the refuge for Batista Cuba's upper and middle class, Miami has the best-organized, wealthiest (and whitest) Latino community in the U.S. In contrast, it may have the most degraded African-Americans. In both 1982 and 1989, Latin American immigrant policemen shot African-American citizens under suspicious circumstances, triggering major black riots.
Florida blacks with anything on the ball quickly wise up and head for Atlanta, where the white business class is a lot easier to shake down. (Vaca, however, points out that even in Georgia there are expected to be more Hispanics than blacks by 2010.)
As white as Miami's Cuban powerbrokers are, they feel no white guilt whatsoever. After all, they hadn't oppressed American blacks (which is certainly true-before 1959 they had been busy back home oppressing Cuban blacks).
Compton, the spiritual home of West Coast gangsta rap, is notorious for its corrupt and dysfunctional black-run government. Still, a lot of people south of the Border have been down so long that even Compton looks like up to them.
By 2001, 59% of Compton's residents, but only 15% of its voters, were Latino. Chicano activists routinely demand that Compton's black elected officials share power with its voteless illegal aliens. But the African-American leadership responds with ringing endorsements of the sanctity of citizenship that would warm the hearts of VDARE readers.
Of course, in the long run, the American-born children of Compton's illegal immigrants will vote their own Latino hacks into the city job sinecures (as recently happened in nearby Lynwood). In the meantime, however, Compton's black political class is getting while the getting's still good.
Few of Vaca's stories are edifying. In some, it's as hard to figure out who morally deserves support as it was during the Iran-Iraq war.
Not surprisingly, most black and brown activists wish Vaca had never written the book. (One longtime ally in the Chicano movement stomped out of the bar when Vaca described the subject of his work, and hasn't talked to him since.) And in fact it wasn't very discreet of Vaca to document for us "gringos" that the modern civil rights movement is just another pork-snorting contest over who can shove the most snouts into the taxpayer-subsidized trough.
Occasionally, though, Vaca's narrative rises above war stories about the tawdry ethnic jostling for taxpayer-supported jobs and discusses legitimate issues. Unlike the economic illiterates at the Wall Street Journal Editorial Page, who proclaim that immigrants do the jobs Americans don't want, lawyer Vaca simply takes it as one of his seven axioms that "Immigrants Will Compete for Unskilled Jobs with African Americans."
In this dispute, Vaca's allegiance lies with his fellow co-ethnics. My loyalties, however, have to rest with my fellow American citizens. Nobody asked African-Americans if they wanted to come here. They got dragged here in chains. In contrast, immigrants chose America, presumably warts and all so it's hard to understand why they should get special privileges based on their ethnicity.