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e-Book Etymological Dictionary of the Latin Language epub download

e-Book Etymological Dictionary of the Latin Language epub download

Author: Francis Edward Jackson Valpy
ISBN: 1402173849
Pages: 562 pages
Publisher: Adamant Media Corporation (November 30, 2005)
Language: English
Category: Foreign Language Study & Reference
Size ePUB: 1898 kb
Size Fb2: 1127 kb
Size DJVU: 1648 kb
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 821
Format: lrf doc docx txt
Subcategory: Reference

e-Book Etymological Dictionary of the Latin Language epub download

by Francis Edward Jackson Valpy



Book digitized by Google from the library of the New York Public Library and uploaded to the Internet Archive by user tpb.

Book digitized by Google from the library of the New York Public Library and uploaded to the Internet Archive by user tp. .Donor Challenge: Help us reach our goal! To the Internet Archive Community, Time is running out: please help the Internet Archive today.

An etymological dictionary discusses the etymology of the words listed. Often, large dictionaries, such as the Oxford English Dictionary and Webster's, will contain some etymological information, without aspiring to focus on etymology.

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations.

Francis Edward Jackson Valpy. Библиографические данные. Francis Edward Jackson Valpy. A. J. Valpy, sold by Baldwin and Company, 1828. Владелец оригинала: Нью-Йоркская публичная библиотека.

Etymological dictionary - An etymological dictionary discusses the etymology of the words listed. Often, large dictionaries, such as the OED and Webster s, will contain some etymological information, without aspiring to focus on etymology.

Автор: Valpy Francis Edward Jackson Название: An.Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy.

Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy.

This Elibron Classics edition is a facsimile reprint of a 1828 published in London.
Vonalij
Kooky and fun, this way out-of-date book is from a corner of the 1800s when some believed that Latin came from Greek, literally.

We now know that Latin and Greek both came from Proto-Indo-European.

But this inexpensive volume covers a great wealth of Latin vocabulary in an interesting way, and draws all sorts of interesting polyglot comparisons with Greek. I thought it was something more modern and less bizaare, but for the price I do recommend it to the discerning customer, amateur, and scholar. It's good to have something like this around to strike the resonating gong of humility in our hearts and cause us to pause and consider our own age's best efforts at not only the truth, but also what is important in life, worth doing and worth studying.

Such is the wealth afforded to us often by works now much-aged and inexpensive if even in print at all.
Global Progression
The book appears to be a photocopy of a much older book. Either the original was pretty illegible or the photocopy is, but in any case, a great number of the letters are not intelligible. If you know the words, it's not so bad. If not, it can be difficult to determine whether the word contains A or E or U or O, because, along with the consonants, the full letter does not always appear so you have to estimate. It was cheap, so I consider it worthwhile, but for those with no previous knowledge of Latin, not very useful.
misery
This book is a xerox copy of a very old tome that came before the days when they knew how the Indo-European languages were related. The core assumption of this book is WRONG, that is, that Latin springs from Greek. We all know now that Greek and Latin are cousin languages which both sprang from Indo-European. This book, besides this major misconception, is riddled with errors. Nonetheless, it's a useful work and a fun read for word nerds.
Samardenob
Haven't used it too much yet, but as I do have a fascination for dictionaries, mostly about ethymological ones, I am certainly going to, very soon. It is a fac-simile of the 1828 one, and although the language has its XIX century peculiarities, it is not a big an effort to read it.
Twentyfirstfinger
In this etymological dictionary, Valpy attempts and successfully manages to represent the Latin language as a language mainly developed from Ancient Greek, a development of which its beginning is lost in time and reached its peak at the time of Augustus, when Latin language borrowed more than 10,000 words from Greek.

In addition, it justifies what many famous Latins and Greeks - Dionysius Alicarnaseus, Quintilianus, Varro, Claudius Didymus, Philoxenus Alexandreus, Terentianus Maurus etc, - have already confirmed a couple of millennia earlier, that the majority of the Latin language derives from Greek and especially from the Aeolic dialect.

Although this etymological dictionary doesn't cover the total of Latin language, purposely leaving out many words like names of men, places and technical words, because as the author states, they are easy to find in other attested works, it does cover a huge amount of the Latin language.

Valpy's etymologies even if not fully detailed are attested and methodically scientific; he is tracing the Latin word back to its Greek etymon, and leaving it there, since as he states: "...then becomes the province of the Greek Etymologist to trace it further back into Greek..." Besides, his etymologies have been historically supported since the decipherment of the Linear B inscriptions by Michael Ventris in 1953, which took the Greek language back in time for at least 6 centuries (15th cent BCE), making Linear B a powerful tool at the hands of modern etymologists, a tool that Valpy couldn't have.

The reader must consider here that this dictionary doesn't trace the words back to the hypothetical IE words and bases that many modern Indoeuropeanists vastly use in their etymologies nowadays, since that approach has only been used in modern etymologies for a few decades and this dictionary was written long before that. However, that is not necessarily a waste, simply because etymology by definition traces a word back to its etymon, and, as more and more etymologists are starting to recognize, a reconstructed hypothetical word or base while it has great value in the study of comparative linguistics, is far away from being considered as an etymon.

One possible snag with the book is that an average reader will not only need some knowledge of Latin but also must be able to at least read Greek, in order to follow the Latin words to their Greek etyma.

This is a dictionary that must have its place in the library of a student of Latin language and/or anyone who is interested in the science of etymology.