» » Beyond the Sky and the Earth: A Journey into Bhutan
e-Book Beyond the Sky and the Earth: A Journey into Bhutan epub download

e-Book Beyond the Sky and the Earth: A Journey into Bhutan epub download

Author: Jamie Zeppa
ISBN: 157322815X
Pages: 320 pages
Publisher: Riverhead Books; Reissue edition (May 1, 2000)
Language: English
Category: Writing Research & Publishing Guides
Size ePUB: 1742 kb
Size Fb2: 1511 kb
Size DJVU: 1896 kb
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 824
Format: lit docx mobi mbr
Subcategory: Reference

e-Book Beyond the Sky and the Earth: A Journey into Bhutan epub download

by Jamie Zeppa



Although to Zeppa Bhutan is a magical land, she cautions herself and the reader not to deem it "the last Shangri-La .

Although to Zeppa Bhutan is a magical land, she cautions herself and the reader not to deem it "the last Shangri-La," as is often done by the lucky travelers who make their way through the red tape required for entry into the kingdom. Bhutan is not without its problems: it is an underdeveloped country plagued by the problems that affect many places cut off from modernity.

Jamie Zeppa was 24 when she left a stagnant life at home and signed a contract to teach for two years in the . What's also extraordinary about "Beyond the Sky and the Earth" is Zeppa's imaginative style of description

Jamie Zeppa was 24 when she left a stagnant life at home and signed a contract to teach for two years in the Buddhist hermit kingdom of Bhutan. Much more than just a travel memoir. What's also extraordinary about "Beyond the Sky and the Earth" is Zeppa's imaginative style of description. Unlike the conventional lackluster scenery narratives of most contemporary travel literatures, Zeppa's depictions are artistic and breathe life into the mysticism and beauty of a landscape forgotten by time. All around, the mountains rise and rise, pale gold and brown in the February light.

Anthology for Edexcel IGCSE. Beyond the Sky and the Earth: A Journey into Bhutan' - Analysing the text. Published: 08/05/2017 KS4 Reading 9 pages.

Zeppa’s surroundings and the tremendous change in her life are indeed breathtaking. Her book may offer the last, best long look at today’s Hermit Kingdom. With empathy, intelligence and self-mocking wit, Zeppa chronicles her passage from sheltered First World child to clearer-eyed citizen of a wider world.

Zeppa went to Bhutan as a teacher on a two-year Canadian government contract "Stirring, poignant, funny, and full of joy, Beyond the Sky and the Earth is at once a classic tale of discovery and adventure, and a love story - between a woman and a country, . .

Zeppa went to Bhutan as a teacher on a two-year Canadian government contract. Stirring, poignant, funny, and full of joy, Beyond the Sky and the Earth is at once a classic tale of discovery and adventure, and a love story - between a woman and a country, a people, a ma. -BOOK JACKET. Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Beyond the Sky and Earth or Beyond the Sky and the Earth: A Journey into Bhutan is a memoir written by Jamie Zeppa of her experience working as a lecturer in English at the Sherubtse College near Trashigang in eastern Bhutan. Zeppa took up an assignment for two years. The book was first published in 1999

A Journey into Bhutan. People Who Read Beyond the Sky and the Earth Also Read. Zeppa’s story sheds the customary contours of the year-abroad memoir and starts to become something more like a memoir of conversion, a testament of newfound faith.

A Journey into Bhutan. A Journey into Bhutan. Inspired by Your Browsing History.

Zeppa uses factual writing to show how vulnerable the state of Bhutan was. "Easy to picture a giant child gathering earth in great armfuls, piling up rock, pinching mud into ridges. Metaphor to show how random the movements of the land are and how they could have been done by a child. Does not even have traffic lights. Fact that shows again how outdated the community is and again how isolated that they don't have this mundane piece of civilisation we expect in western world.

Jamie Zeppa was 24 when she left a stagnant life at home and signed a contract to teach for two years in the Buddhist hermit kingdom of Bhutan. Much more than just a travel memoir, Beyond the Sky and the Earth is the story of her time in a Himalayan village, immersed in Bhutanese culture and the wonders of new and lasting love. Whether you're travelling to Bhutan, looking for the best travel writing around, or wishing to be transported to a culture, mindset, and spiritual ethos wonderfully different from your own, Beyond the Sky and the Earth is a joyous and lush memoir that will transform the way you think of faith, Western life, and love.
Andromathris
This book has received plenty of praise from other reviewers and now I can add mine. It was a pleasure from start to finish and one of those books that, while hard to put down, you don't want to end either. Through her wonderful descriptions, honesty and humor, you are transported with the author on her both brave and naive venture into a vastly different culture and terrain than anything she has ever known. She starts out with great trepidation, wondering whether she has made a huge mistake and having no idea if she will have the strength of constitution or character to survive without her accustomed level of personal comforts and safety. It is an experience that allows her personal growth and an unexpected opportunity for reevaluating her values and reforming her path for the future. I bought this book initially to learn something of the culture of Bhutan prior to a trip we are planning, but got SO much more from it - certainly one of the best I have read in a while.
Bluecliff
I expected a first hand account of experiences with a unique and isolated culture, not the diary of a self absorbed college girl who just happened to find herself on the other side of the world. I got too little of the former and too much of the latter, with most of the Bhutanese people acting as background extras to Zeppa’s starring role. The author frustratingly contradicts herself repeatedly throughout the book, lecturing the reader about how our western values should not be pushed on the people of Bhutan, while often in the same paragraph doing exactly that as she forces her very Canadian ideals of gender roles on them. In the second half of the book, the cultural study of the people completely dries up in favor of Zeppa’s self justification of highly unethical behaviors.
Mpapa
After earning her master's degree in English literature from York University, Toronto/Sault Ste. Marie native, Jamie Zeppa, became lost with her life's course. Yearning for adventure, she impulsively leaves her country, fiancé, and a potential doctorate education to teach English for two years in Bhutan; an isolated Himalayan kingdom, often referred to as the world's last Shangri-La; a country that has repelled globalization, undergoing little change in centuries.

"I want to go home. I tell Sasha I am coming down with something, and lie in bed and wish for things: a Cosmopolitan magazine, a bagel and cream cheese, a grocery store, the Eaton Centre two days before Christmas."

Due to the polarization between the industrialized society of Canada and the rural way-of-life in Bhutan, Zeppa struggled tremendously with her process of acculturation. People no longer spoke English, Buddhism became the dominant religion, urban infrastructure was practically non-existent, and all the simple pleasures of Canadian life were gone. Misery consumed her as the risk of disease and sickness was brought into focus: a house infested with rats and bugs, questionable meat at the local markets, and hospitals that were miles away. However, with the help and kindness of the Bhutanese people, her fears would progressively dissipate and Bhutan would become her serenity.

"I remember my arrival in Bhutan and how miserable I was, and all the other teachers who seemed inexplicably content. They were right all along, I think. This is the most remarkable place, after all."

Fundamentally, "Beyond the Sky and the Earth" is a love story. It is a memoir that recollects Zeppa's romance with a landscape, a people, a culture, and a man. Intricately written with compassion, Zeppa's book fashions us- the reader- into her persona, and systematically render us into her affection for a place. We will be carried along with her, as she journeys through joy and heartbreak; empathize with her as she flows from triumphs to struggles and righteousness to shame. And by the end of it all, we all will be humbled by it.

"They [her young students] curl up under a blanket, and I stand in the doorway, watching their small faces relax into sleep. I must squeeze my eyes tightly to stop the tears. If I feel this sad leaving Pema Gatshel after five months, I cannot imagine how I will feel leaving Bhutan after two years."

What's also extraordinary about "Beyond the Sky and the Earth" is Zeppa's imaginative style of description. Unlike the conventional lackluster scenery narratives of most contemporary travel literatures, Zeppa's depictions are artistic and breathe life into the mysticism and beauty of a landscape forgotten by time.

"All around, the mountains rise and rise, pale gold and brown in the February light. At one end of the valley, beyond a wall of black, broken peaks, one white summit shimmer; at the other end, the mountains grow tamer, softly rounded and turning smoky blue in the distance."

The only flaw- if it's even considered a flaw- with "Beyond the Sky and the Earth" is the book's potential to manufacture subjective non-literary criticisms. There are certain scenarios in the story in which the author comes off rather hypocritical. Some readers may also be distressed by Zeppa's heightened libido towards her male [college] students. But nevertheless, "Beyond the Sky and the Earth" is a well-written, concise, and honest piece of literature that is full of heart. It is a philosophical, anthropological, geographical, sociological lesson all bundled together inside the boundaries of an entertaining travel memoir. It is an experience and a pleasure to read- and similar to the country of Bhutan itself, this book is a hidden beauty. I highly recommend it.
Wizard
This is a memoir in the very turest sense of the word. As with many menoirs, this one is a mixture of honesty, sometimes too much honesty, some striking gaps, some self-deception, and some 'meretricious adornment'.

I bought the book on recommendation from a friend and also read some of the (positive and negative reviews before delving in). What is good in this book (the very personal view of Bhutan in the 90s by a young naif from Canada--who appears to have had limited exposure even to the complexities of her own country's multiple cultures) is indeed quite good. What is bad (the retelling of her romance with and eventual marriage to one of her students) is not as bad as I had been led to believe by the negative reviews.

To my mind, the book is as much about how exposure to another culture helps someone grow up (you could easily plug in a number of other countries/situations) as it is a narrative about life in this rather unique, far away country. For those who know Bhutan through a visit of their own, there is much to recognize and remember. For those who do not, this is an interesting (if somewhat dated) introduction to a country that is full of complexities and contradictions. It is a shame that while Zeppa is quite willing to describe pretty intimate details of her romance and her own family's (most notably her grandfather's) and friends' reaction and eventual acceptance, she is virtually silent on how she was received by her Bhutanese inlaws. One gets a sense that life continues to be complicated, but you kind of feel left hungry at the table.