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e-Book Renewing the Covenant: A Theology for the Postmodern Jew epub download

e-Book Renewing the Covenant: A Theology for the Postmodern Jew epub download

Author: Eugene B. Borowitz
ISBN: 0827604009
Pages: 319 pages
Publisher: Jewish Pubn Society; 1St Edition edition (December 1, 1991)
Language: English
Category: Judaism
Size ePUB: 1192 kb
Size Fb2: 1179 kb
Size DJVU: 1592 kb
Rating: 4.1
Votes: 866
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Subcategory: Religion

e-Book Renewing the Covenant: A Theology for the Postmodern Jew epub download

by Eugene B. Borowitz



Borowitz, Eugene B. Publication date.

Borowitz, Eugene B. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Renewing the Covenant book. Eugene B. Borowitz is Sigmund L. Falk Distinguished Professor of Education and Jewish Religious Thought at the Hebrew Union College - Jewish Institute of Religion in New York City, where he has taught since 1962. He is the author of numerous books and the first person to receive a National Foundation for Jewish Culture Achievement Award in Scholarship for work in the field of Jewish thought.

Borowitz's work in covenant theology found its mature expression in his 1991 book, Renewing the Covenant (273). One of Borowitz's most significant accomplishments was his founding of Sh'ma, a Journal of Jewish Responsibility in 1970. Albany, NY: State University of New York Press, 2000. Judaism After Modernity, Papers from a Decade of Fruition. Lanham, MD: University Press of America, 1999.

Home Browse Books Book details, Renewing the Covenant: A Theology for the. Renewing the Covenant: A Theology for the Postmodern Jew. By Eugene B. Borowitz. I shall not be giving much attention to our premodern history in this book - more precisely, I simply take our general academic understanding of it for granted - so that I can concentrate on the problems and possibilities of Jewish belief today. Modernity challenges us to mediate between the Jewish truth we have inherited and cherish, and that which our surrounding culture deems worth embracing.

Renewing the Covenant: A Theology for the Postmodern Je. .Philadelphia: Jewish Publication Society, 1991. Recommend this journal.

by Peter Ochs & Eugene B. Borowitz & Yudit Kornberg Greenberg. Don't ruin a good today by thinking about a bad yesterday. Let it go. ― Anonymous. Systems Thinking, : Managing Chaos and Complexity: A Platform for Designing Business Architecture. 09 MB·98,376 Downloads·New!

Title: Renewing the Covenant By: Eugene B. Borowitz Format .

Title: Renewing the Covenant By: Eugene B. Borowitz Format: Paperback Number of Pages: 336 Vendor: Jewish Publication Society Publication Date: 1996. Dimensions: . 8 X . 4 X . 8 (inches) Weight: 1 pound 2 ounces ISBN: 0827606273 ISBN-13: 9780827606272 Stock No: WW606270. The postmodern era refers to the 20th century, especially post-Holocaust and contemporary Judaism. In this latest work Borowitz, a theologian of liberal Judaism, rabbi, and noted scholar, presents an in-depth philosophical examination of the Covenant. He draws upon the existential theories of Immanuel Kant, Friedrich Hegel, Martin Buber, Abraham Heschel, and others.

Only a year later, Eugene Borowitz, professor of Jewish theology at Hebrew Union College, the Reform movement’s rabbinical seminary, originally published Renewing the Covenant: A Theology for the Postmodern Jew. A leading thinker of Reform Judaism, Borowitz drew on th. A leading thinker of Reform Judaism, Borowitz drew on the discourse of postmodernism in the service of calling for a retrieval of tradition

A reflection on Eugene Borowitz’s 'Renewing the Covenant; a Theology for the Postmodern Jew' (1991)" in Le’ela, 35 (1993) 29-32.

Albany, NY: State University of New York Press, 2000. The Jewish Moral Virtues (with Frances W. Schwartz). Philadelphia: the Jewish Publication Society, 1999. A reflection on Eugene Borowitz’s 'Renewing the Covenant; a Theology for the Postmodern Jew' (1991)" in Le’ela, 35 (1993) 29-32. Bibliography, 1944-1999, additional works.

Borowitz creatively explores his theory of Covenant, linking self to folk and God through the contemporary idiom of relationship.

Deodorant for your language
I'm stuck; I admit it. I have always considered myself a religiously inclined person, who believes in G-d; but I am also the perfect product of the post-modernist world view that my generation is heir to. As such, I have found myself constently torn between my deep rooted beliefe in G-d, and my modern sensabilities, which requires that I view my reality through a lense of reason, with full regard for the uncertainties that science and the scientific method seems to cast on my faith. I thus constantly swing between the competing philosophies of the new atheists and the modern orthodox. Hitchens and Harris, et al, make for some uncomfortable bed fellows with the likes of Solovetchick and Heschel. But hey, that is what it means to be a liberal Jew who came of age during the 60's and 70's. It's a balencing act, and for thinking people today, those of us who are concerned about faith but who are not willing to check their brains at the door, many of us find ourselves teetering between the pull of faith and the demands of reason.

Borowitz tackles this difficult problem head on and unapologetically. His problem is my problem; i.e. how do I define myself as a Jew light of the mandate imposed by reason? What role does Halacha play in our definition of what it means to be a Jew, for the person who is unwilling (or unable) to accept the revelation at Sinai as a "fact". What claim does tradition have on me, in light of my regard for science and the universal application of reason? In other words, what does it mean to be a Jew after Kant and the enlightenment?

It's no small problem, and Borowitz confronts the issue without flinching. I cannot say that all of his answers are fully satisfactory; but it is truly refreshing to see these questions handled in a systematic, thoughful and unapologetic manner. Borowitz is a man of faith, and he doesn't waste any time trying to justifiy his faith. Instead he devotes himself to the problem at hand, reconciling Jewish particularism and our normative value system to the insights granted us by the enlightenment.

Borowitz writes in hearfelf and compelling prose, but keeps his analysis keen and honed to the point. He exhaustively surveys modern thinkers from Tillich and Buber, to Kaplan, Cohen and Heschel. This is one of the best books on the topic I have read; and I read a lot on this topic. I'm a tough grader; I haven't given out a 5 star rating yet to anyone; but this book comes close. It is well worth the time, and is very highly recommended.
JUST DO IT
Had “aha” moments all through the book
Perongafa
Borowitz begins with the assumption that "...a very large part of modernized Jewry - including many nominally Orthodox - is made up of Jews who know that their Judaism must allow greater personal freedom than the one they inherited ...."

The answer, for Borowitz, will emerge from examining 1) mediation between Judaism and contemporary culture, 2) dialogue with Jewish traditions, and 3) the testing of what emerges in the form of Jewish action in the cultures within which Jews find themselves. This book focuses primarily on the first, Judaism's response to secular culture.

Borowitz is articulate and cogent in his defense of self-actualization, the "autonomous Jewish self," as the key to personal integrity. And, in his examination of Conservative Judaism's premise that "rabbinic councils" may determine what is acceptable conduct for their members, his scrutiny is precise and challenging. "Why should thinking Jews consider giving up their self-determination to follow the rulings of decisors who have Jewish learning but otherwise no greater access to God's present will than the rest of us possess?"

This work is a superb representation of the though processes of an intelligent and deeply committed Jew who finds a sold base in "Liberal Judaism."
Wen
I enjoyed reading Rabbi Borowitz's book. It helped me rediscover my own faith and spiritual path.
lacki
The book arrived promptly and in first rate condition. I have examined but not yet read much of the book, but I know it will be valuable for my purposes.