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e-Book Wide Ruins: Memories from a Navajo Trading Post epub download

e-Book Wide Ruins: Memories from a Navajo Trading Post epub download

Author: Sallie Wagner,Edward T. Hall
ISBN: 0826318053
Pages: 162 pages
Publisher: University of New Mexico Press; 1st edition (September 1, 1997)
Language: English
Category: Other Religions Practices & Sacred Texts
Size ePUB: 1791 kb
Size Fb2: 1486 kb
Size DJVU: 1342 kb
Rating: 4.4
Votes: 220
Format: lrf lrf mbr docx
Subcategory: Religion

e-Book Wide Ruins: Memories from a Navajo Trading Post epub download

by Sallie Wagner,Edward T. Hall



Start by marking Wide Ruins: Memories from a Navajo Trading Post as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Start by marking Wide Ruins: Memories from a Navajo Trading Post as Want to Read: Want to Read savin.

Wide Ruins: Memories from a Navajo Trading Post Paperback. This is an extremely good book about Wide Ruins Trading Post in the late 1930's and 40's. I have read other books about this trading post, but this book covers the Cousins' experiences throughout their lives with other trading posts too and their relationship with the Navajo Indians in the Southwest.

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Hope this helps, Susie. Mary Sue Stephenson, P.

Author: Sallie R. Wagner. From the Glittering World: a Navajo story. Words from a Wide Land.

Newlyweds Sallie Wagner and Bill Lippincott came to the Navajo Reservation in 1938. Wide Ruins" is a wonderful reading experience on an interesting topic

Newlyweds Sallie Wagner and Bill Lippincott came to the Navajo Reservation in 1938. Before they knew it, they owned a trading post at Wide Ruins, Arizona. Wide Ruins" is a wonderful reading experience on an interesting topic. Sallie Wagner weaves a personal tale of her experiences as the trader at Wide Ruins, Arizona, in the 1940's. Her story progresses quickly and she seems to provide enough detail of her experiences without lingering too long on any one topic. She vividly describes the role of the trading post and of the traders. The trading post was a general store, a pawn shop, and a safety deposit box.

Vintage navajo indian wide ruins rug - clean + fine weave 30x45". Marilynn Francis, Wide Ruins Rug, Navajo Handwoven, 31" x 43".

Электронная библиотека. Поиск книг Z-Library B–OK. Download books for free. File: EPUB, . 2 MB. 3. Sisters in Spirit: Iroquois Influence on Early Feminists. The years they spent there were the best of their lives, and this lively, honest memoir recalls them in detail. Trading post life combined business with the kinds of experiences generally associated with anthropological field work. Like many traders, Sallie Wagner influenced the weavers whose rugs she purchased. She was one of the traders who persuaded weavers to use vegetal dyes, leaving a permanent legacy in Navajo weaving.

Newlyweds Sallie Wagner and Bill Lippincott came to the Navajo Reservation in 1938. Before they knew it, they owned a trading post at Wide Ruins, Arizona. The years they spent there were the best of their lives, and this lively, honest memoir recalls them in detail. Trading post life combined business with the kinds of experiences generally associated with anthropological field work. Like many traders, Sallie Wagner influenced the weavers whose rugs she purchased. She was one of the traders who persuaded weavers to use vegetal dyes, leaving a permanent legacy in Navajo weaving. Tourists discovered Indian reservations in the 1930s, and the Lippincotts were visited often by friends and strangers alike, many unable to navigate reservation roads.

"This story is a must read for those interested in the Navajo people in the early days. Sallie Wagner has managed to catch and retain the essence of what it meant to be white in a Navajo world that was unbelievably different."--Edward T. Hall

Cherry The Countess
"Wide Ruins" is among the most interesting memoirs of American rural life, gaining piquancy by its exotic locale: the Navajo Reservation in 1938-50, a time when most Navajos had little contact with the outside world.

Sallie and Bill Lippincott were newlywed anthropologists when they took over the derelict general store - called a trading post in Indian Country. Their academic training in getting to know outside cultures may have helped them adapt. Wagner - as Sallie Lippincott was when she wrote this book nearly 50 years later - does not say.

In any event, according to her version they got on well. When they moved to Oregon, one of their Navajo friends sent them $5 - a lot of money for a Navajo, even in 1950 - toward their expenses for moving back. Nevertheless, there remained many things that the Lippincotts were not told.

For example, one day a mysterious child showed up. He was described as "a mifflin," but what that was or who he was was never revealed.

Wagner reveals just a little of her personal life, enough to sketch a personality, but she and Bill are in the background in these stories. And there are plenty of them. Wagner does not waste words. In about 140 pages, there must be about 140 anecdotes, about wild rides through storms and into quicksand, humorous encounters with tourists who didn't understand Indians and Indians who didn't understand tourists, family feuds, touching gestures, violent episodes, including a triple murder.

Life may have been restricted at Wide Ruins but it seems never to have been quiet for long.

A theme running through the tale is Wagner's effort to get the Wide Ruins women to improve their weaving - both the technique, the quality and the designs. Wagner patiently induced them to switch from purchased to local vegetable dyes and to switch from gaudy to quieter designs.

She was unsuccessful, though, in getting the mothers to adopt Gerber baby food, which Wagner thought would be better for the babies than the fry-bread, coffee and sugar they were weaned to.
Hono
Irreplaceable. A treasured narrative of a unique time and place.
Faebei
Interesting book about long ago Navajo Reservation Trading Post that is no longer. I was disappointed to see that my relatives that ran that Post for many, many years was not mentioned. Dean Winn and his family, ran it for many years, don't know why he was not mentioned.
Bolanim
"Wide Ruins" is a wonderful reading experience on an interesting topic. Sallie Wagner weaves a personal tale of her experiences as the trader at Wide Ruins, Arizona, in the 1940's. Her story progresses quickly and she seems to provide enough detail of her experiences without lingering too long on any one topic. She vividly describes the role of the trading post and of the traders. The trading post was a general store, a pawn shop, and a safety deposit box. The traders were resourceful businessmen who could conduct business without any actual money trading hands. They were esteemed residents who helped the Navajo people survive a difficult time in America's history.
This memoir is a significant piece of literature because it was written by one who actually lived in a world that few non-Navajos ever get to see. She decribes the Navajo people and the Navajo culture in a way that makes their time and place real. It is not an academic study by a distant scholar of the culture. It is a personal account of a world that no longer exists, and as such, it is a treasure. I would also recommend "Navajo Trader" by Cladwell Richardson in addition to "Wide Ruins".