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e-Book The Monk and the Philosopher : A Father and Son Discuss the Meaning of Life epub download

Author: Jean Francois Revel,Matthieu Ricard
ISBN: 0805241620
Pages: 336 pages
Publisher: Schocken (January 26, 1999)
Language: English
Category: Religious Studies
Size ePUB: 1625 kb
Size Fb2: 1281 kb
Size DJVU: 1474 kb
Rating: 4.2
Votes: 858
Format: lit docx rtf lrf
Subcategory: Religion

e-Book The Monk and the Philosopher : A Father and Son Discuss the Meaning of Life epub download

by Jean Francois Revel,Matthieu Ricard



By Jean-François Revel and Matthieu Ricard. Jean Francois-Revel, a pillar of French intellectual life in our time, became world famous for his challenges to both Communism and Christianity

By Jean-François Revel and Matthieu Ricard. Jean Francois-Revel, a pillar of French intellectual life in our time, became world famous for his challenges to both Communism and Christianity. Twenty-seven years ago, his son, Matthieu Ricard, gave up a promising career as a scientist to study Tibetan Buddhism - not as a detached observer but by immersing himself in its practice under the guidance of its greatest living masters. Meeting in an inn overlooking Katmandu, these two profoundly thoughtful men explored the questions that have occupied humankind throughout its history

Jean Francois-Revel, a pillar of French intellectual life in our time, became world famous for his challenges to both .

Jean Francois-Revel, a pillar of French intellectual life in our time, became world famous for his challenges to both Communism and Christianity. Twenty-seven years ago, his son, Matthieu Ricard, gave up a promising career as a scientist to study Tibetan Buddhism - not as a detached observer but by immersing himself in its practice under the guidance of its greatest Jean Francois-Revel, a pillar of French intellectual life in our time, became world famous for his challenges to both Communism and Christianity.

French philosopher Revel (Without Marx or Jesus) and his son, Tibetan Buddhist monk Ricard, engage in a dazzling intellectual tete-a-tete on metaphysics, morality and meaning

French philosopher Revel (Without Marx or Jesus) and his son, Tibetan Buddhist monk Ricard, engage in a dazzling intellectual tete-a-tete on metaphysics, morality and meaning. In 1972, Ricard abandoned a promising career in molecular biology and announced his intention to study with Tibetan Buddhist lamas in Asia. Initially, Revel was disappointed with his son's decision to study Buddhism, for, as an atheist, Revel had never taken Buddhism or any other religion very seriously

Электронная книга "The Monk and the Philosopher: A Father and Son Discuss the Meaning of Life", Jean Francois Revel, Matthieu Ricard.

Электронная книга "The Monk and the Philosopher: A Father and Son Discuss the Meaning of Life", Jean Francois Revel, Matthieu Ricard. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Monk and the Philosopher: A Father and Son Discuss the Meaning of Life" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

The Monk and the Philosopher: A Father and Son Discuss the Meaning of Life. by Jean-François Revel · Matthieu Ricard. Twenty-seven years ago, his son, Matthieu Ricard, gave up a promising career as a scientist to study Tibetan. The Quantum and the Lotus: A Journey to the Frontiers Where Science and Buddhism Meet. by Matthieu Ricard · Trịnh Xuân Thuận.

The Monk and the Philosopher: A Father and Son Discuss the Meaning of Life, by Jean-François Revel and Matthieu Ricard, Schoken Books In. 2005, 384 pages, . .

The book is in the form of a series of conversations between Jean-François Revel, a French intellectual known for his defense of liberalism and wariness of the totalitarian tendencies of religion, and his son Matthieu Ricard, who in the early 1970s abandoned a promising career in molecular genetics to study Tibetan Buddhism in Darjeeling. For Revel, his son’s decision to choose Eastern wisdom over the fruits of Western liberalism must have come as a shock. The Monk and the Philosopher: A Father and Son Discuss the Meaning of Life, by Jean-François Revel and Matthieu Ricard, Schoken Books In. 2005, 384 pages, £1. 4 pb, ISBN: 978-0805211030.

Jean-Francois Revel and Matthieu Ricard. The relationship between father and son is always complex. Fathers want the best for their sons, and sons balance a natural tension of wanting to learn from father, and live up to his father’s expectations, while exploring all that is new and exciting in the world. It is a respectful yet powerful tension between old and new, experience and novelty, obedience and autonomy, belief and curiosity, advice and adventure

At the hands of noted French philosopher Revel (Democracy Against Itself: The Fate of the Democratic Impulse, 1993 .

As a young man, Ricard left a promising career in biology to pursue a deeper wisdom under the tutelage of Tibetan monks exiled in India, including the Dalai Lama

Jean-François Revel (born Jean-François Ricard; 19 January 1924 . The Monk and the Philosopher : A Father and Son Discuss the Meaning of Life.

Jean-François Revel (born Jean-François Ricard; 19 January 1924 – 30 April 2006) was a French journalist, philosopher, and a member of the Académie française from June 1998 onwards. Revel is best known for his books Without Marx or Jesus: The New American Revolution Has Begun, The Flight from Truth: The Reign of Deceit in the Age of Information and his 2002 book Anti-Americanism, one year after the September 11 attacks of 2001. In the last of these books, Revel criticized anti-Americanism and Europeans who argued that the United.

Jean Francois-Revel, a pillar of French intellectual life in our time, became world famous for his challenges to both Communism and Christianity. Twenty-seven years ago, his son, Matthieu Ricard, gave up a promising career as a scientist to study Tibetan Buddhism -- not as a detached observer but by immersing himself in its practice under the guidance of its greatest living masters.Meeting in an inn overlooking Katmandu, these two profoundly thoughtful men explored the questions that have occupied humankind throughout its history. Does life have meaning? What is consciousness? Is man free? What is the value of scientific and material progress? Why is there suffering, war, and hatred? Their conversation is not merely abstract: they ask each other questions about ethics, rights, and responsibilities, about knowledge and belief, and they discuss frankly the differences in the way each has tried to make sense of his life.Utterly absorbing, inspiring, and accessible, this remarkable dialogue engages East with West, ideas with life, and science with the humanities, providing wisdom on how to enrich the way we live our lives.
BlackBerry
I wanted an introduction to Buddhism, this book is a back and forth between a father and his son and they are both so intelligent. It took me a while to read because I learned about so many things, also about the situation in tibet. It's really all the questions you can imagine asking next to a great, concise and very explained answer. It makes you want to be a better and more altruistic person.
Kagrel
This dialogue between Matthieu Ricard and his father Jean-Francois Revel is similar to Ricard's other East/West philosophical dialogue (The Quantum and the Lotus: A Journey to the Frontiers Where Science and Buddhism Meet), but with more depth, rigor and intimacy - thus real communication and exchange. Ricard and Revel are both well qualified for this exchange in two important respects - first is their philosophical/intellectual and experiential qualification. Revel is a respected thinker and author of both classical and post-modern Western philosophy. Ricard was raised in this mold (in France), but went on to embrace Tibetan Buddhism after completing his PhD in molecular biology to live with and translate for some of the greatest Tibetan Lamas of the 20th century (from 1972 to present). As a result he is perhaps the most qualified and able representative of the Buddhist tradition in a Western context.

The second qualification these two share is the love, respect and comfortable rapport of being intimately bonded as father and son. Revel's role here is primarily as the scholar interlocutor with a list of predetermined points designed to draw out Ricard's understanding of Buddhism. He is the clear thinking Western materialist and skeptic. Often he relates his son's responses to European philosophy and psychology from ancient Greek to the modern sciences, and appears genuinely surprised and delighted to learn of Asia/Buddhism's theoretical contributions (to human thought) long before Europe's. He is also quick to point out when Buddhism is merely covering old ground that European philosophy has mined extensively as well. Yet he consistently does this with passion and heart. It is especially touching to see his genuine appreciation of his son's deep and clear understanding.

For me this dialogue is very relevant (as a Westerner with longstanding involvement in Tibetan Buddhism). These materialistic questions are just the kind that I come up with on my own, or field from friends and family (and are probably similar to the ones Ricard would pose to his teachers in his role as the Western 'devils advocate'). The fact that Ricard is so well informed (and steeped in Buddhist culture) makes his responses especially instructive and reliable. (At times the two tread on very subtle ground, and Ricard's lifetime of learning and personal experience help keep it clear and on point.)

As in The Quantum and The Lotus there is a decided advantage for the Buddhist side, as Ricard concedes no ground, while his father's more open and dualistic point of view is gradually and steadily worn down by the gentle yet relentless presentation of the Buddha's Middle Way (yet in the end Revel too concedes little ground). My only criticism is that Ricard sometimes is too safe by presenting only the 'party line', with very little personal flavor. He also glosses over some of the Tibetan cultural traits which have contributed to their current situation (loss of national sovereignty and promotion of an easily misunderstood religious tradition steeped in magic and mystery). The result is that this book stays on safe and sometimes superficial ground.

Generally though this makes for a great intellectual beginner's book to Buddhism, the essence of the path and not the form of the traditions, as well as a comparative overview of it's universal message (vis-a-vis Western science, philosophy and religion). What makes this book unique and valuable is the combination of the range of inquiry, depth of clarity and genuine warmth of the dialogue.
Todal
I really liked this book at the start. The more I read, the harder it got to understand. The last half is like a philosophy textbook. I struggled to finish reading this book. I am fascinated by the Monk. I would like to meet him and get to know him as a person. The Philosopher is the father of the Monk. I think the Dad is asking questions to his son and trying to understand the son's thinking. The Philosopher is an academic from a university setting and the Monk is siting on a bed bug infested cot in a cave up in the mountains meditating for 14 hours a day. They are radically different in every way possible.
Najinn
This is a brilliant book. The father is a learned philosopher and a skeptic. The son believes in Buddhist philosophy (after much analysis). The discussion spans multiple religions and philosophers, and the arguments are very logical, reflecting the analytical brilliance of both participants. A very good read.
Mariwyn
This is the best brief digest of the principal trends in 20th century intellectual life in the West, and in France in particular. The dialog format has been a format for philosophical give-and-take since Plato, and the ease with which Revel and his son navigate the great ideas is very engaging and satisfying.
Moralsa
Two brilliant but down-to-earth people discuss the meaning of life -- one is a knowledgeable, highly regarded French novelist, the other, his son, a well-educated scientist who decided to become a Buddhist monk. Their discussion flows easily and touches every imaginable aspect of life and religion. there's nothing obscure, no unnecessary words; it's a pure delight to read it. Both of Ricard's books, The Monk and the Philosopher, as well as The Quantum and the Lotus, are two of my favorite books. They are brilliantly written, clear and easy to read, and full of wisdom and knowledge.
Thank you, Roswitha Mcintosh
Linn
I can respect the passion both men have for knowledge and life. One could clearly accept that these two men are related. Their personalities are very much alike despite the contrast of belief systems. I learned a lot and glad I purchased it!
The dialogue between Revel & Ricard are meaningful & intellectually provocative. Their open, critical & coherent discussion not merely enabled me to learn more about meaning of life, thru the lenses of both Western philosophy & Eastern Buddism, but also guided me to see things in a more lucid perspective. I look forward to exploring, learning, & experiencing more about the path to enlightenment introduced by Ricard.