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e-Book Nearest Star: The Surprising Science of Our Sun epub download

e-Book Nearest Star: The Surprising Science of Our Sun epub download

Author: Leon Golub,Jay M. Pasachoff
ISBN: 0674004671
Pages: 288 pages
Publisher: Harvard University Press; First Edition edition (May 11, 2001)
Language: English
Category: Astronomy & Space Science
Size ePUB: 1823 kb
Size Fb2: 1701 kb
Size DJVU: 1671 kb
Rating: 4.5
Votes: 342
Format: txt rtf lrf docx
Subcategory: Science

e-Book Nearest Star: The Surprising Science of Our Sun epub download

by Leon Golub,Jay M. Pasachoff



This book explores the Sun in a comprehensive way for the non-scientific reader who .

This book explores the Sun in a comprehensive way for the non-scientific reader who wants to gain a general idea of the range and significance of solar physics. We explain: What is known about the Sun and how this knowledge is Discuss the origins of the Sun's light and heat, and Explore how the Sun evolved and what it will become. This book features actual results from the current spacecraft that are now analysing the Sun, especially NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory or SDO. (Co-author Golub designed some of the SDO's telescopes.

Nearest Star: The Surprising Science of Our Sun. Leon Golub, Jay M. Pasachoff. Скачать (pdf, . 9 Mb).

Leon Golub, Jay M. Pasachoff

Leon Golub, Jay M. Unlike the myriad points of light we gaze at in the night sky, our nearest star allows us to study the wonders of stellar workings at blindingly close range-from a mere 93 million miles away. And what do we see? In this book, two of the world's leading solar scientists unfold all that history and science-from the first cursory observations to the measurements obtained by the latest state-of-the-art instruments on the ground and in space-have revealed about the Sun.

The Sun is the only star near enough to study in sufficient detail to provide rigorous tests of our theories and help us. .Jay Pasachoff is a Professor of Astronomy at Williams College.

The Sun is the only star near enough to study in sufficient detail to provide rigorous tests of our theories and help us understand the more distant and exotic objects throughout the cosmos. Having observed the Sun using both ground-based and spaceborne instruments, the authors bring their extensive personal experience to this story revealing what we have discovered about phenomena from eclipses to neutrinos, space weather, and global warming.

by Leon Golub and Jay M. Pasachoff Fascinating Science of the Sun. By Thriftbooks. com User, May 26, 2005. Nearest Star is a very well put together descritption of Solar features and physics aimed at the layman to the moderately experienced observer. I strongly recommend this book. Fascinating Science of the Sun. I enjoyed reading this book. Sometimes it can be easy to forget just how fascinating our sun really is. This book helps in this regard. It describes the theories of what the sun was like 5 billion years ago, compared with what it is like today

The Sun is the only star near enough to study in sufficient detail to provide rigorous tests of our theories and help . See all 5 brand new listings. item 1 Nearest Star by Leon Golub, Jay M. Pasachoff 1107672643 The Cheap Fast Free -Nearest Star by Leon Golub, Jay M. Pasachoff 1107672643 The Cheap Fast Free.

by Leon Golub & Jay M. Harvard University Press, 2002. The book is made up of 8 fairly lengthy chapters. ISBN 0-674-01006-X, pp. xii + 267. £1. 0 (pbk). Nearest Star is one of several descriptive works on the Sun to have appeared during the recent solar maximum. Its authors are both well-known US solar astronomers. It aims to present a general description of our current understanding of the Sun and its effects on our planet. I was particularly impressed with the lucid description in the introductory chapter of the various instruments used by astronomers to observe the Sun. Chapter 2 describes how the Sun evolved and how it is predicted to evolve in the future.

Jay Myron Pasachoff (born 1943) is an American astronomer Nearest Star: The Exciting Science of Our Sun, co-authored with Leon Golub (Harvard University Press, 2001).

Jay Myron Pasachoff (born 1943) is an American astronomer. Pasachoff is Field Memorial Professor of Astronomy at Williams College and the author of textbooks and tradebooks in astronomy, physics, mathematics, and other sciences Selected publications. Nearest Star: The Exciting Science of Our Sun, co-authored with Leon Golub (Harvard University Press, 2001).

Unlike the myriad points of light we gaze at in the night sky, our nearest star allows us to study the wonders of stellar workings at blindingly close range--from a mere 93 million miles away. And what do we see? In this book, two of the world's leading solar scientists unfold all that history and science--from the first cursory observations to the measurements obtained by the latest state-of-the-art instruments on the ground and in space--have revealed about the Sun. Following the path of science from the very center of this 380,000,000,000,000,000,000-megawatt furnace to its explosive surface, Nearest Star invites readers into an open-ended narrative of discovery about what we know about the Sun and how we have learned it.

How did the Sun evolve, and what will it become? What is the origin of its light and heat? How does solar activity affect the atmospheric conditions that make life on earth possible? These are the questions at the heart of solar physics, and at the center of this book. Having made optical solar observations with many solar telescopes and in the rockets and satellites, the authors bring their extensive personal experience to this story of how astronomers study the Sun, and what they have discovered about phenomena from eclipses to neutrinos, space weather, and global warming. Richly illustrated with an assortment of pictures from the latest solar missions and the newest telescopes, this book is a very readable, up-to-date account of science's encounter with our nearest star.

September
Nearest Star is a very well put together descritption of Solar features and physics aimed at the layman to the moderately experienced observer. I strongly recommend this book. Stephen Ramsden. [...]
digytal soul
This is a great introduction to the sun and various elements of its physics and its effects on the earth. It is written in straightforward, non-technical language, and is just a great read for scientist and non-scientist alike.
I love Mercedes
The sun is, for us here on Earth, the most important star: the one that dominates our world, essential to our lives, as well as what will ultimately destroy our planet.

Golub and Pasachoff lay out not just our knowledge of our star, but how we gained that knowledge. It has been a long process, gaining speed only in the last couple of centuries, and a far more convoluted path than at first glance it might appear. That's because the Earth and Sun interact, and it isn't always apparent what the cause of a particular effect is. Climate in particular is the product of a number of interacting and chaotic causes. Our orbit is elliptical, not circular; the Earth precesses on its axis; the Sun itself has cycles, the eleven-year sunspot cycle as well as other, longer cycles--and once we know all this, there's still more to understand.

We look at the Sun, and we see a great, glowing ball. It doesn't look complicated at all. Yet even before we had more advanced instruments, eclipses and the telescope let us discover and begin to study the photosphere of the Sun. The authors make the tale of how we made crucial discoveries, as well as the substance of those discoveries themselves, exciting and compelling.

The subject matter is at times demanding, but the writing is clear and understandable.

Recommended for anyone who enjoys good science writing.

I received a free electronic galley from the publisher via NetGalley.
porosh
Popular science books have to walk a difficult line between scientific detail and an accessible level of simplification. Golub and Pasaschoff do an admirable job here of elucidating what is a highly technical and intricate field. I was reading from only a high-school level of physics knowledge but found most of the book to be comprehensible. Some points left me wondering but sometime I would like to reread and try to work these out. The authors writing style is commendably clear and delineates well what is known, what is likely and what is yet to be discovered using a set of great diagrams and also some beautiful colour slides. Frequently, you may find yourself wondering, "how can they possibly know in such detail about such a distant object?" Fortunately the authors provide excellent and entertaining histories of how our understanding of the sun has developed over the millenia and these are often the most interesting part. The best thing about the book overall though has to be the authors' enthusiasm for the subject which truly imparts to the reader a sense of awe and wonder for our nearest star. Although the subject matter is not as exotic as you might find in The Elegant Universe or Brief History of Time, this too is a highly entertaining and well written exposition of contemporary science for the layman.
Water
This is a remarkably wide-ranging overview of topics relating to the Sun. It is, in fact, probably rather more wide-ranging than it needs to be. Rather than focusing on the subtitle, it includes chapters on eclipses and earth's climate as well as seemingly rather pointless asides on topics like carbon dating.
The core, however, is quite good, covering the history of solar science as well as our current understanding. A standout chapter covers planned space missions that will investigate the Sun, something I found particularly interesting since I am currently working on one of them (STEREO) and have worked on others in the past.
In summary, when it's good it's very good, but it tries to cover more than it needs to and disappoints in that respect.
Cherry The Countess
I enjoyed reading this book. Sometimes it can be easy to forget just how fascinating our sun really is. This book helps in this regard. It describes the theories of what the sun was like 5 billion years ago, compared with what it is like today. It discusses the visible part of the sun, as well as the interior of the sun. It also discusses the process of what makes the sun shine, as well as affects on earth, as well as space weather. All is very fascinating, though very complex. At times it is difficult to follow, and at times it gets slightly off the topic. Nevertheless, I would recommend this book to anyone interested in learning more about our sun.