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e-Book The World Without Us epub download

e-Book The World Without Us epub download

Author: Adam Grupper,Alan Weisman
ISBN: 142720148X
Publisher: Macmillan Audio; Unabridged edition (July 10, 2007)
Language: English
Category: Biological Sciences
Size ePUB: 1771 kb
Size Fb2: 1742 kb
Size DJVU: 1123 kb
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 771
Format: mbr txt lit lrf
Subcategory: Science

e-Book The World Without Us epub download

by Adam Grupper,Alan Weisman



The World Without Us is a non-fiction book about what would happen to the natural and built environment if humans suddenly disappeared, written by American journalist Alan Weisman and published by St. Martin's Thomas Dunne Books.

The World Without Us is a non-fiction book about what would happen to the natural and built environment if humans suddenly disappeared, written by American journalist Alan Weisman and published by St. It is a book-length expansion of Weisman's own February 2005 Discover article "Earth Without People".

The World Without Us book.

Читать онлайн The World Without Us. Weisman Alan. In memory of. Sonia Marguerite. from a world without you. Das Firmament blaut ewig, und die Erde Wird lange fest steh’n und aufblüh’n im Lenz. Du aber, Mensch, wie lange lebst denn du? The firmament is blue forever, and die Earth Will long stand firm and bloom in spring. But, man, how long will you live? -Li-Tai-Po/Hans Bethge/Gustav Mahler The Chinese Flute: Drinking Song of the Sorrow of the Earth Das Lied von der Erde.

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Alan Weisman's The World Without Us is supposed to explore what would or could happen to our world if humans suddenly ceased to exist

Alan Weisman's The World Without Us is supposed to explore what would or could happen to our world if humans suddenly ceased to exist. So, Weisman takes us on a tour from the mass extinction of the passenger pigeon in North American, to the Moa bird in New Zealand. We look at climate change, nuclear waste, and plastic islands in the oceans.

Alan Weisman, Author of The World Without U. Alan Weisman; Read by Adam Grupper. Alan Weisman is an award-winning journalist whose reports have appeared in The Atlantic Monthly, Harper's, The New York Times Magazine, Discover, on NPR, and more

Alan Weisman, Author of The World Without Us. Watch this amazing demonstration of what will happen to your house over the next 500 years when left to the forces of Mother Nature. Learn more about the post-human Earth in THE WORLD WITHOUT US, by Alan Weisman. Alan Weisman is an award-winning journalist whose reports have appeared in The Atlantic Monthly, Harper's, The New York Times Magazine, Discover, on NPR, and more.

The World Without Us (Inglés) CD de audio – 10 jul 2007. por Alan Weisman (Autor), Adam Grupper (Narrator). But it's a fascinating book, and Grupper handles it well

The World Without Us (Inglés) CD de audio – 10 jul 2007. de 5 estrellas 1 calificación. Ver todos los 7 formatos y ediciones Ocultar otros formatos y ediciones. But it's a fascinating book, and Grupper handles it well. Grupper's careful narration brings to life Weisman's judicious organization, unambiguous grammatical structure and vivid descriptions of what would become of land, sea, fish, flora and fauna should humans disappear from the face of the earth. Weisman explains the earth's capacity for self-healing.

The World Without Us. Written by Alan Weisman. Narrated by Adam Grupper

The World Without Us. Narrated by Adam Grupper. In this far-reaching narrative, Weisman explains how our massive infrastructure would collapse and vanish without human presence; which everyday items may become immortalized as fossils; why some of our earliest buildings might be the last architecture left; and how plastic, bronze sculpture, and man-made molecules may be our lasting gifts to the universe.

To Alan Weisman, this nightmare scenario would be merely a promising start. In his morbidly fascinating nonfiction eco-thriller, The World Without Us, Weisman imagines what would happen if the earth’s most invasive species - ourselves - were suddenly and completely wiped out. Writers from Carson to Al Gore have invoked the threat of environmental collapse in an effort to persuade us to change our careless ways.

Rare book
Saithi
Alan Weisman's The World Without Us is supposed to explore what would or could happen to our world if humans suddenly ceased to exist. Weisman does do this, but he must of necessity discuss how we have altered/destroyed much of our world, in order to illustrate what would happen if we were to disappear.

So, Weisman takes us on a tour from the mass extinction of the passenger pigeon in North American, to the Moa bird in New Zealand. We look at climate change, nuclear waste, and plastic islands in the oceans. It is a depressing catalog.

The only bright spot is that, to quote Jurassic Park, nature finds a way. Animals, plants and birds no longer found in Korea thrive in the depopulated DMZ. In the quarantine zone around Chernobyl, wolves have returned, along with moose, deer, badger, and horses.

The take away, the world will do fine without us. In fact, it might just thrive.
Winn
The reason you came for this book is probably to find out what will happen to your home or New York City after people disappear. You want to learn if it will really be like "I Am Legend" or other Post-Apocalyptic stories where people are gone. At least, that's why I came.
And Weisman does explain just that. But he does so in the first few chapters. The remain 15 or so go into details about Earth without man you never would have expected. He examines places like Cyprus and the Korean DMZ, which people haven't touched in ages. He takes you places you never would have expected. Each chapter is a different story, a different location, a different analysis. Each could be it's own article.
This book ends up teaching a lot about human history as well. I certainly didn't expect that.
This book is an interesting read, a learning adventure across the globe. As cheesy as it sounds, its a great ride.
Steelraven
I bought this book from the angle of a writer of post-apocalyptic stories. I wanted to understand exactly how the world would degrade (and how quickly) once humans were taken out of the picture. But most of this book is a history lesson.

I understand the need to look back in time in order to see where we might be in the future. But the time frames were so far-flung (and therefore so unrelatable) that I found much of this book so thoroughly boring that it was a real struggle to get through.

It's also obvious that the author did enormous amounts of research in putting this book together. Unfortunately, that left a lot of instances where the book went into painful detail about how this concept or that concept worked, and was just more writing for me to struggle through.

I really, really wanted to love this book. And while there are gems sprinkled throughout, I found the book as a whole to be utterly boring.
Ces
Quit different from the TV series. This book focuses mostly on the environmental consequences of our civilization if it were to vanish overnight.
The author uses examples of abandoned areas on earth now, such as the exclusion zone around Chernobyl and the DMZ on Cyprus to try and show what our planet used to look like before civilization came along.
He sites the work of researchers all over the world documenting the accumulation of waste and garbage that already clogs our oceans and beaches, such as the great Pacific gyre, and attempts to give an idea of how long it will take mother nature to clean up after us.
He also talks about the 400+ nuclear power plants and waste storage sites all over the world and gives an estimate of how long it would take to decay below lethal levels.
This is not light reading and the book assumes the reader has some basic scientific knowledge, but the style and prose are reader friendly.
Recommended for anyone with an environmental bent or those who just want to know what we might leave behind us.
Kipabi
For a book that is supposed to discuss the future and what would happen to the world if humans were to suddenly disappear, you would think it would discuss what would happen in great detail. Instead, this book spends 80% of it's pages discussing history, pre-history, and how humans have ruined everything. The first two chapters hook you in by discribing how houses and cities will fall apart without humans to maintain them, but the next 4 chapters are about natural history and evolution of animals and plants throughout Europe, Africa, and the Americas, most of which are extinct (which the author goes into verbose detail about how humans are responsible). After 100 pages I couldn't take it anymore, I wanted to learn about infrastructure and how nature will take back the world, but this book goes off on so many unrelated tangents that I gave up. I feel like I got jipped.