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e-Book Darwin's Legacy: What Evolution Means Today epub download

e-Book Darwin's Legacy: What Evolution Means Today epub download

Author: John Dupre
ISBN: 0199284210
Pages: 160 pages
Publisher: Oxford University Press; Revised ed. edition (September 29, 2005)
Language: English
Category: Biological Sciences
Size ePUB: 1829 kb
Size Fb2: 1253 kb
Size DJVU: 1680 kb
Rating: 4.1
Votes: 876
Format: docx txt azw lit
Subcategory: Science

e-Book Darwin's Legacy: What Evolution Means Today epub download

by John Dupre



Overall, Darwin's Legacy is a great reading for anyone interested in mankind, or simply curious about the (lack of) scientific grounds for evolutionary psychology.

Overall, Darwin's Legacy is a great reading for anyone interested in mankind, or simply curious about the (lack of) scientific grounds for evolutionary psychology.

This book shows that although there are particular aspects of the theory of evolution which remain controversial, and issues still to be settled, there can no longer be any doubt that the basis of the theory is true. It examines the consequences for our view of human nature, religion, and non-human animals.

From Eve to Evolution: Darwin, Science, and Women's Rights in Gilded Age America. Poems on Darwin and Evolution, one on the division of evolution and creationism and one on the contents of the book, "Descent to Man" published in 1871. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2014. Volume 14 Issue 2 - Judith A. Allen.

Charles Darwin transformed our understanding of the universe and our place in it with his development of the theory of evolution. Oxford University Press (2005). Similar books and articles. 150 years later, we are still puzzling over the implications. University of Exeter. Charles Darwin transformed our understanding of the universe and our place in it with his development of the theory of evolution. John Dupr presents a lucid, witty introduction to evolution and what it means for our view of humanity, the natural world, and religion.

бесплатно, без регистрации и без смс. This book shows that although there are particular aspects of the theory of evolution which remain controversial, and issues still to be settled, there can no longer be any doubt that the basis of the theory is . . This book shows that although there are particular aspects of the theory of evolution which remain controversial, and issues still to be settled, there can no longer be any doubt that the basis of the theory is true. It examines the consequences for our view of human nature, religion, and non-human animals

Charles Darwin transformed our understanding of the universe and our place in it with his development of the theory of evolution. John Dupre presents a lucid, witty introduction to evolution and what it means for our view ofhumanity, the natural world, and religion.

Darwin's Legacy book. Start by marking Darwin's Legacy: What Evolution Means Today as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

This book shows that although there are particular aspects of the theory of evolution which remain controversial, and issues still to be settled, there can no longer be any doubt that the basis of the theory is true. It examines the consequences for our view of human nature, religion, and non-human animals

Find sources: "John Dupré" – news · newspapers · books · scholar · JSTOR . Darwin's Legacy: What Evolution Means Today.

Find sources: "John Dupré" – news · newspapers · books · scholar · JSTOR (September 2011) (Learn how and when to remove this template message). John A. Dupré (born July 3, 1952) is a British philosopher of science. In particular, he criticises stories and how they are related in sociobiology and evolutionary psychology. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005

The theory of evolution has fundamentally changed our view of the universe and our place in it. By providing a radically new vision of the origin of human beings, it challenged long-held assumptions about our own significance and undermined the major arguments for the existence of God. But almost 150 years after the publication of Darwin's Origin of Species these implications are still not properly understood, and in some sectors of society they are actively resisted. The last decade has also seen the rise of a new field, evolutionary psychology, which takes the theory of evolution to provide insight into aspects of human culture and behaviour as diverse as language, morality, sexuality, and art. This book shows that although there are particular aspects of the theory of evolution which remain controversial, and issues still to be settled, there can no longer be any doubt that the basis of the theory is true. It examines the consequences for our view of human nature, religion, and non-human animals. John Dupré then investigates the appropriation of evolutionary biology by psychologists, and argues that their claims are largely spurious: despite its status as one of the most important scientific ideas of all time, the theory of evolution has very little to tell us about the details of human nature and human behavior.
Nanecele
Did you read Dawkins's "The Selfish Gene" and "The Blind Watchmaker" with some enthusiasm? Have sociobiological plausibilities become a part of your world view? Be prepared to revise some of your ideas. Dupré lines up against a gene-centred shortening of evolutionary theory. He advocates things like multi-level selection and especially developmental systems theory ("...the smallest unit in terms of which evolutionary process can be properly understood is the full developmental cycle from one stage of the life cycle through all the intervening stages needed to reproduce that stage in the next generation ..." "... the genome is merely one developmental resource - no doubt a very important one ...", p. 86). But that's not all: the author is well aware of the importance cultural development has for human behaviour. "Victorian country gentry almost surely engaged in less sexual activity than, say, contemporary british holiday-makers in Ibiza, and not because of any difference in their genes." (p. 116) Whether in biology or in philosophy Dupré is an unerring critic of the "Zeitgeist". No wonder that he doesn't have any sympathy for the contemporary appeasement strategy for reconciling science and religion which is derived from the so-called Argument from Design and has become a whole intelligent-design movement. In his chapter on "Human Origines and the Decline of Theism" Dupré leaves no doubt that he wants "to claim that whatever Darwin's goals, and whatever his contemporaries may have made of his ideas, the growth of evolutionary theory that he launched has provided a fatal injury to the pretensions of religion." (p. 41/42) But even if you are not inclined to naturalism: read the book, at least as a biological layman it will at once complicate and clarify your ideas about evolution and perhaps provoke further reading (appropriate hints at the end of the book).
Faugami
John Dupre is a notoriously non-orthodox philosopher of biology. In this latest book of his, he takes a stand against "evolutionary psychology", a fashionable doctrine that claims to explain contemporary human behavior based on pseudo-Darwinian arguments.

If the theory of evolution is now widely accepted, a number of issues remain unsolved: Is natural selection by itself sufficient for understanding evolution? Which parameters are optimized to achieve greater fitness? And what exactly is selected? Is it the single gene, as Richard Dawkins suggested in his influential book, The Selfish Gene? Is it the organism? The group? The species? Dupre believes that it is actually the entire developmental cycle. In other words, the unit of selection is "the ability to gather together and deploy the full set of resources necessary for producing the next generation". This theory is called developmental systems theory (DST), and it reconciles evolution (at the scale of the species) with development (at the individual scale).

Dupre then brings us one step farther: In the case of humans at least, evolution is not only genetic but also cultural. There is an evolutionary continuity of humans and other animals, but language (that Dupre calls "the most significant distinctively human feature") gives us the ability to develop complex thought and elaborate cultures. Our genome is probably Stone Age-old, but our cultural environment has considerably changed over the history of mankind and has an impact on contemporary humans that is hard to ignore. Without claiming, like Steven Pinker for example, that biology is entirely non-relevant and that only culture shapes an individual's mind (in the so-called "blank state" theory), Dupre believes that the cultural context tells us at least as much about human nature as does the genome. Evolutionary psychologists, on the other hand, choose to focus on humans' "structure" and to neglect their "context" (Dupre uses the words structure/context to avoid the controversial nature/nurture terms, which may or may not be a good thing).

The confounding fact, as very nicely demonstrated in Chapter 6, is the lack of evidence for evolutionary psychology. "The evolutionary psychologist is typically advancing a thesis about human nature at the same time as offering an explanation of the trait hypothesized" (page 89). Moreover, the analogies from humans to other animals are often arbitrary, not based on any verifiable evolutionary process, while conveniently overlooking counterexamples that would be no less relevant. The link to genetics is even weaker, if not completely speculative: Genetics should only be used to explain phenomena that are largely insensitive to environmental contingencies. Its misuse is prone to harmful misconceptions about our species.

Dupre reminds us that evolutionary psychology rose from the ash of sociobiology, decidedly inappropriate since E. O. Wilson's disreputable book (Sociobiology: The New Synthesis, 1975) and the ensuing accusations of racism, sexism and generally bad science. The same pitfalls await evolutionary psychologists when they claim that all men have a "natural" disposition to rape, for instance. I believe that the same goes with the "Men are from Mars, women are from Venus" frenzy. An important conclusion is that we are, so to speak, more "free" than evolutionary psychologists would like us to believe: "Biological explanations of social facts are frequently interpreted as having conservative implications. If it's part of our biology, the thought goes, we might as well just learn to live with it. No such implication is necessary, however" (page 115).

Overall, Darwin's Legacy is a great reading for anyone interested in mankind, or simply curious about the (lack of) scientific grounds for evolutionary psychology. I would give the book five stars if not for the following weak points: Dupre tends to repeat himself or to restate his previous books. He is probably right to be so skeptical towards reductionism, but his case was already made in his first book (The Disorder of Things: Metaphysical Foundations of the Disunity of Science). I was also unhappy with Chapter 4, a curious incursion into the debate of science (specifically, the theory of evolution) and religion. Although I find myself to agree with Dupre's "anti-supernaturalistic" (!) perspective, I was disappointed at his oversimplistic account of that famously complex issue. Even more disturbing is the fact that Dupre does not mention any other religion than Christianity, which makes his arguments even weaker. Let's hope he elaborates on evolution and religion(s) in a future publication.