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e-Book Putting Biodiversity on the Map: Priority Areas for Global Conservation epub download

e-Book Putting Biodiversity on the Map: Priority Areas for Global Conservation epub download

Author: C. J. Bibby,etc.,International Council for Bird Preservation
ISBN: 0946888248
Pages: 90 pages
Publisher: BirdLife International; First Edition edition (January 1992)
Language: English
Category: Biological Sciences
Size ePUB: 1246 kb
Size Fb2: 1966 kb
Size DJVU: 1524 kb
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 332
Format: docx rtf lit lrf
Subcategory: Science

e-Book Putting Biodiversity on the Map: Priority Areas for Global Conservation epub download

by C. J. Bibby,etc.,International Council for Bird Preservation



Putting biodiversity on the map: priority areas for global conservation by C. J. Bibby, N. Collar, M. Crosby, .

Putting biodiversity on the map: priority areas for global conservation by C. Heath, Ch. Imboden, T. H. Johnson, A. Long, A. Stattersfield and S. Thirgood (. ISBN 46888-24-8) is a 1992 book published by the International Council for Bird Preservation. The book introduced the Endemic Bird Area (EBA) concept and argued for its use as a means of identifying important areas for the conservation of all biodiversity worldwide.

Organization(s): ICBP (International Council for Bird Preservation). Abstract: Monographic Series no.

Putting Biodiversity . .Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Putting Biodiversity On The Map: Priority Areas For Global Conservation.

Putting Biodiversity on the Map: Priority Areas for Global Conservation. Protected natural areas and the military. Environmental Conservation, 19(4), pp. 343–8. International Council for Bird Preservation, Cambridge, England, UK: vi + 90 p. illustr. Transfrontier Reserves for Peace and Nature: a Contribution to Human Security.

List of environmental books. Lists of endemic birds. Putting Biodiversity on the Map. ▾LibraryThing members' description. No descriptions found. Library descriptions.

ICBP (1992) Putting Biodiversity on the Map: Priority Areas for Global Conservation, International Council for Bird Preservation, Cambridge, U. oogle Scholar

ICBP (1992) Putting Biodiversity on the Map: Priority Areas for Global Conservation, International Council for Bird Preservation, Cambridge, U. oogle Scholar. Vol. 4: Nearctic and Neotropical, International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources, Gland, Switzerland and Cambridge, U. Cite this chapter as: Crosby . 1994) Mapping the distributions of restricted-range birds to identify global conservation priorities. eds) Mapping the Diversity of Nature. Crosby, M. F. Lond, A. Thirgood, International Council for Bird Preservation, pp 90, £1. 0 pb. So the International Council for Bird Preservation’s report Putting Biodiversity on the Map comes as a welcome relief. It shows that international organisations can focus global attention on regional sites in special need of conservation action. Firstly, the global total of bird species is known to within plus or minus 1 per cent, and no new large groups of species will appear to upset the analysis.

Author of Putting biodiversity on the map, 1990 IUCN red list of threatened animals, 1990 IUCN red list of threatened animals. Created April 30, 2008. Reference: Important Bird and Biodiversity Areas (IBAs): The development and characteristics of a global inventory of key sites for biodiversity. Important Bird Areas - Criteria to selecting sites of global conservation signiicance.

This is an important document prepared by ICBP. Based on worldwide studies, it states that because much of the world's threatened biodiversity can be found in comparatively small areas, protection of these areas would ensure the survival of a disproportionately high variety of species. Birds are good indicators of these key areas, and analysis of distribution has revealed that species of restricted range tend to occur together, in Endemic Bird Areas (EBAs). The survey identifies some 221 EBAs, with most (76 percent) occurring in the tropics. The report concludes that as these same areas are generally also very important for other species, the future of all EBAs is critical for global biodiversity conservation.