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e-Book The Rainforests of West Africa: Ecology ― Threats ― Conservation epub download

e-Book The Rainforests of West Africa: Ecology ― Threats ― Conservation epub download

Author: MARTIN
ISBN: 3764323809
Pages: 235 pages
Publisher: Birkhäuser; 1st Edition. edition (February 4, 1991)
Language: English
Category: Earth Sciences
Size ePUB: 1657 kb
Size Fb2: 1750 kb
Size DJVU: 1592 kb
Rating: 4.9
Votes: 324
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Subcategory: Science

e-Book The Rainforests of West Africa: Ecology ― Threats ― Conservation epub download

by MARTIN



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Ecology - Threats - Conservation. Past and present developments here are in one way or the other significant for rainforests on other continents as weil. West Africa is a pioneer in both a good and a bad sense. This is reason enough to take a closer Iook at the history of moist tropical West Africa. Until recently, no one really seemed to be interested in the rainforests except for a few specialists.

West Africa is a pioneer in both a good and a bad sense. Until recently, no one really seemed to be interested in the rainforests except for a few specialists

West Africa is a pioneer in both a good and a bad sense. The world's scientific community neglected to study the incalculable riches of tropical forests, to make the public aware of them and their due importance.

cle{Nisbertt1993TheRO, title {The rainforests of West Africa: ervation}, author {Richard A. .Discussing the economics of traditional hunting and bushmeat consumption, Claude Marti. ONTINUE READING. Nisbertt}, journal {International Journal of Primatology}, year {1993}, volume {14}, pages {665-666} }. Richard A. Nisbertt. Shortly after the 1988 hunting ban in Liberia was declared, I was engaged by the Forest Development Authority to conduct a primate survey of the 1300-km 2 Sapo National Park.

Perceived conservation success was greatest for large protected areas surrounded by similar habitat with strong public . The Rainforests of West Africa: Ecology, Threats, Conservation.

Perceived conservation success was greatest for large protected areas surrounded by similar habitat with strong public support, effective law enforcement, low human population densities, and substantial support from international donors. Contrary to expectations, protected area success was not directly correlated with employment benefits for the neighboring community, conservation education, conservation clubs, or with the presence and extent of integrated conservation and development programs. January 1992 · Africa.

ecology, threats, conservation. Published 1991 by Birkhäuser Verlag in Basel, Boston Places. Published 1991 by Birkhäuser Verlag in Basel, Boston. Rain forest conservation, Forests and forestry, Rain forests, Rain forest ecology, Internet Archive Wishlist, Sylviculture, Tropischer Regenwald, Conservation, Forets pluviales, Forest conservation, Ecologie des forets pluviales. Includes bibliographical references (p. 219-223) and index. Translated from the German.

Abstract: Monographic Series n. Conference: Imprint: Basel, CH : Birkhäuser, 1991.

The Collins English Dictionary defines conservation as "saving and protecting the environment. The Merriam-Webster dictionary defines conservation as "a careful preservation and protection of something; especially: planned management of a natural resource to prevent exploitation, destruction, or neglect.

The Rainforests of West Africa: Ecology, Threats and Conservation. Myth and Reality in the Rainforest - How Conservation Strategies are Failing in West Africa. Basel, Switzerland: Birkhäuser Verlag. Action Plan for African Primate Conservation 1986-1990. IUCN/SSC Primate Specialist Group. Gland, Switzerland: IUCN. Berkeley: University of California Press. Abedi-Lartey, . McGraw, . Extinction of a West African red colobus monkey. Conservation Biology 14: 1526-1532.

This book offers a timely, clear-headed, and uniquely important contribution to conservation, one that should be read . Oates is one of a minority of people who actually cares about the fates of West Africa's amazing forests and their wildlife.

This book offers a timely, clear-headed, and uniquely important contribution to conservation, one that should be read by all bureaucrats, scientists, and others involved with development projects that supposedly benefit wildlife and wilderness. -George B. Schaller, author of Wildlife of the Tibetan Steppe. Most consultants, as he notes in the book, hardly visit these fast disappaearing forests. And no wonder: to see this mass destruction with your own eyes is almost unbearable.

Nowhere eise in the world did industrialized countries leave such early marks in the rainforest as in West Africa. Past and present developments here are in one way or the other significant for rainforests on other continents as weil. West Africa is a pioneer in both a good and a bad sense. This is reason enough to take a closer Iook at the history of moist tropical West Africa. Until recently, no one really seemed to be interested in the rainforests except for a few specialists. The world's scientific community neglected to study the incalculable riches of tropical forests, to make the public aware of them and their due importance. Although interdisciplinary research has been a popular topic for some decades now, it was not applied to just the most complex habitat on earth. Scientists from all fields studied only that which was easiest to record, seemingly blind to a myriad of details awaiting closer examination. Botanists wentabout establishing their herbariums and paid much too little attention to the vegetation as a whole, or to the significance of useful plants for local populations. Zoologists, too, busied themselves with collecting and describing species. Anthropologists, on the other hand, tended to overlook faunal details: in their ignorance of the animal world, they wrote of tigers and deer in Africa. And finally, foresters saw neither the forest nor the trees for the timber - and even confused rainforests with monocultures of fir trees.