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e-Book An Introduction to Number Theory (The MIT Press) epub download

e-Book An Introduction to Number Theory (The MIT Press) epub download

Author: Harold M. Stark
ISBN: 0262690608
Pages: 347 pages
Publisher: The MIT Press; 1st MIT Press paperback ed edition (May 30, 1978)
Language: English
Category: Mathematics
Size ePUB: 1226 kb
Size Fb2: 1909 kb
Size DJVU: 1368 kb
Rating: 4.3
Votes: 367
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Subcategory: Science

e-Book An Introduction to Number Theory (The MIT Press) epub download

by Harold M. Stark



Established in 1962, the MIT Press is one of the largest and most distinguished university presses in the world and a leading publisher of books and journals at the intersection of science, technology, art .

Established in 1962, the MIT Press is one of the largest and most distinguished university presses in the world and a leading publisher of books and journals at the intersection of science, technology, art, social science, and design. American Mathematical Society Monthly.

Ireland, American Mathematical Society Monthly. this book will furnish the student, the teacher and the specialist alike with new methods and new insights into number theory.

The majority of students who take courses in number theory are mathematics majors who will not become number theorists. Many of them will, however, teach mathematics at the high school or junior college level, and this book is intended for those students learning to teach, In addition to a careful presentation of the standard material usually taught in a first course in elementary number theory, this book includes a chapter on quadratic fields which the author has designed to make students think.

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Many of them will, however, teach mathematics at the high school or junior college level, and this book is intended for those students learning to teach, in addition to . .

Many of them will, however, teach mathematics at the high school or junior college level, and this book is intended for those students learning to teach, in addition to a careful presentation of the standard material usually taught in a first course in elementary number theory, this book includes a chapter on quadratic fields which the author has designed to make students think.

Start by marking An Introduction to Number Theory as Want to Read . Paperback, 360 pages. Published May 30th 1978 by Mit Press (first published 1970). An Introduction to Number Theory.

Start by marking An Introduction to Number Theory as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. The book also includes a large number of exercises, many of which are nonstandard. 0262690608 (ISBN13: 9780262690607).

Harold Mead Stark (born August 6, 1939 in Los Angeles, California) is an American mathematician, specializing in number theory. He is best known for his solution of the Gauss class number 1 problem, in effect correcting and completing the earlier work of Kurt Heegner, and for Stark's conjecture. More recently, he collaborated with Audrey Terras to study zeta functions in graph theory. He is currently on the faculty of the University of California, San Diego.

4 results for Books : "An introduction to number theory Harold M. Stark". An introduction to number theory Harold M. An Introduction to Number Theory (The MIT Press).

An introduction to number theory by Harold M. Stark, MIT Press. Elements of the Theory of Numbers by Thomas P. Dence and Joseph B. Dence. This book was sent to me recently by Academic Press

An introduction to number theory by Harold M. Highly recommended! Although it has been used as a text for this course, it does not cover quadratic reciprocity. The author turned 60 just before the start of this semester. The theory of numbers: a text and source book of problems by Andrew Adler and John E. Coury, published in 1995 by Jones and Bartlett. This book was sent to me recently by Academic Press. It is a plausible textbook for Math 115. Introduction to Number Theory by Peter D. Schumer.

Автор: Stark, Harold . Название: An introduction to number theory, Издательство: Wiley Классификация: ISBN .

The majority of students who take courses in number theory are mathematics majors who will not become number theorists. Many of them will, however, teach mathematics at the high school or junior college level, and this book is intended for those students learning to teach, in addition to a careful presentation of the standard material usually taught in a first course in elementary number theory, this book includes a chapter on quadratic fields which the author has designed to make students think about some of the "obvious" concepts they have taken for granted earlier. The book also includes a large number of exercises, many of which are nonstandard.

Inerrace
This book is nice. It mixes in interesting history that motivates the major topics. I've had a graduate class in number theory and was simply mystified by why the topics in it were of interest.
Helldor
Good !
Wenyost
If numbers are over your head, you might not enjoy this book... But, if you want to take your good math skills and make them better, a good study of number theory will do it and this book is a good way to get moving down that path... Now, it is a bit dated, being almost as old as I am... Some of the discussion of work done in the field may be out of date... but the internet can help you check those facts... Otherwise, numbers haven't changed since Adam (1) & Eve (1) = Couple (2)... Did Adam understand number theory... I don't know, but if he had this book, he certainly would have...
Avarm
This book served as the primary text for my undergraduate course on number theory. It starts off how you would expect it to with sections on the Euclidean algorithm, linear diophantine equations, Euler's totient function, congruences and primitive roots. It is pretty conventional until you arrive at the chapter on magic squares (some really cool stuff). I remember being asked to construct a 9-by-9 filled, magic square using integers from 0 to 80 with the property that when divided into ninths, each 3-by-3 subsquare is also magic. While you are most likely to encounter exercises at the beginning of the book that deal with topics such as Fermat's little theorem and perhaps proving that a number like 1729 is a pseudoprime or verifying that there are infinitely many primes of the form 4n-1 and 4n+1, there are some unique problems in this book that explore topics like the sieve of Eratosthenes and continued fractions. I would say that with regards to the content of the book, Stark's introduction to number theory is not your standard, run-of-the-mill text, which is good. I found it incorporated a lot of neat topics like this and the later chapters on quadratic fields prove to be a good insight into algebraic number theory. Highly recommend!
Zulurr
In general, this book gives a comprehensive account on elementary number theory. The first few chapters include some fundamental concepts like divisibility and congruences (i.e. a simple kind of modular arithmetic), as well as famous yet basic theorems like the fundamental theorem of arithmetic. Important topics in number theory such as Diophantine equations, fractional approximations for irrational numbers and Quadratic fields are there, and if you're interested in magic squares, I'd like to say that a whole chapter is devoted to it.
There're some good points featuring this book. It assumes no prerequisite in number theory. Just a bit knowledge about numbers and operations on them are needed. Results and theorems are closely related, allowing you to observe how things are connected. Although not many examples are available, some are really instructive and helpful enough to avoid misconceptions.
However, it's a pity to say that the materials contained are not really well-organized, especially those in Chapter 7: the geometric arguments used in the development of the continued fraction algorithm lack concision, and a few proofs are quite annoying because the author failed to justify some claims that shuold not be treated as something "obvious". It can be motivating just to provide readers guidelines about how to work out those minor stuff, but such things shouldn't have been misleadingly called "proofs". Another problem is that the illustratons presented are occasionally insufficient, and this is particularly the case in the chapter about Diophantine equations. Novices in the subject can hardly rely on the text to solve harder exercises contained without tracing out more technique which is not emphasized.
Overall, the book deserves to be a fine reading for the interested ones new to number theory. But if you're serious about the topic, find an even better book instead.
Low_Skill_But_Happy_Deagle
This book was the required text for an independent study class I enrolled in. The class has been more difficult than I thought it would be, as has the text. It is complex material and doesn't provide a lot of clear-cut examples - instead assuming that you make the connection yourself. However, I am learning all on my own and the material may be more understandable with the help of a live professor.