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e-Book Surprises in Theoretical Physics epub download

e-Book Surprises in Theoretical Physics epub download

Author: Rudolf Peierls
ISBN: 0691082421
Pages: 176 pages
Publisher: Princeton University Press (November 1, 1979)
Language: English
Category: Physics
Size ePUB: 1222 kb
Size Fb2: 1594 kb
Size DJVU: 1110 kb
Rating: 4.5
Votes: 851
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Subcategory: Science

e-Book Surprises in Theoretical Physics epub download

by Rudolf Peierls



Like its predecessor, this book by the renowned physicist Sir Rudolf Peierls draws from many diverse fields of theoretical physics to present problems in which the answer differs from what our intuition had led us to expect

Like its predecessor, this book by the renowned physicist Sir Rudolf Peierls draws from many diverse fields of theoretical physics to present problems in which the answer differs from what our intuition had led us to expect. In some cases an apparently convincing approximation turns out to be misleading; in others a seemingly unmanageable problem turns out to have a simple answer. Peierls's intention, however, is not to treat theoretical physics as an unpredictable game in which such surprises happen at random

Surprises in Theoretical Physics by Rudolf Peierls Princeton Series in Physics ^ . Sir Rudolf Pcierls is Professor of Physics Emeritus at Oxford University.

Sir Rudolf Pcierls is Professor of Physics Emeritus at Oxford University.

Rather, he contends, all the surprises discussed have rational explanations, most of which are very simple, at least in principle. Problems in theoretical physics often lead to paradoxical answers; yet closer reasoning and a more complete analysis invariably lead to the resolution of the paradox and to a deeper understanding of the physics involved.

Sir Rudolf Peierls is Professor of Physics Emeritus at Oxford University. Series: Princeton Series in Physics. Paperback: 176 pages. Publisher: Princeton University Press (November 1, 1979).

He received many awards, including a knighthood in 1968, and wrote several books including Quantum Theory of Solids, The Laws of Nature (1955), Surprises in Theoretical Physics (1979), More Surprises in Theoretical Physics (1991) and an autobiography, Bird of Passage (1985). Concerned with the nuclear weapons he had helped to unleash, he worked on the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, was President of the Atomic Scientists' Association in the UK, and was involved in the Pugwash movement.

Surprises in Theoretical Physics by Rudolf Peierls Princeton Series in Physics ^ .

Surprises in Theoretical Physics book. Drawing primarily from his own experience and that of his collaborators, Sir Rudolf Peierls selects examples of such "surprises" from a wide range of phys Problems in theoretical physics often lead to paradoxical answers; yet closer reasoning and a more complete analysis invariably lead to the resolution of the paradox and to a deeper understanding of the physics involved.

Finding books BookSee BookSee - Download books for free. More Surprises in Theoretical Physics (Princeton Series in Physics). 4 Mb. Bird of Passage: Recollections of a Physicist. 1. 2 Mb. Surprises in theoretical physics (PUP, 1979, 395). 7 Mb.

Much of the Centre's work involves quantum field theory or perturbation theory, and we make extensive use of numerical simulations.

Rudolf Peierls More Surprises in Theoretical Physics (Princeton Series in Physics). Like its predecessor, this book by the renowned physicist Sir Rudolf Peierls draws from many diverse fields of theoretical physics to present problems in which the answer differs from what our intuition had led us to expect. In some cases an apparently convincing approximation turns out to be misleading in others a seemingly unmanageable problem turns out to have a simple answer

Problems in theoretical physics often lead to paradoxical answers; yet closer reasoning and a more complete analysis invariably lead to the resolution of the paradox and to a deeper understanding of the physics involved. Drawing primarily from his own experience and that of his collaborators, Sir Rudolf Peierls selects examples of such "surprises" from a wide range of physical theory, from quantum mechanical scattering theory to the theory of relativity, from irreversibility in statistical mechanics to the behavior of electrons in solids. By studying such surprises and learning what kind of possibilities to look for, he suggests, scientists may be able to avoid errors in future problems.

In some cases the surprise is that the outcome of a calculation is contrary to what physical intuition seems to demand. In other instances an approximation that looks convincing turns out to be unjustified, or one that looks unreasonable turns out to be adequate. Professor Peierls does not suggest, however, that theoretical physics is a hazardous game in which one can never foresee the surprises a detailed calculation might reveal. Rather, he contends, all the surprises discussed have rational explanations, most of which are very simple, at least in principle.

This book is based on the author's lectures at the University of Washington in the spring of 1977 and at the Institut de Physique Nucleaire, University de Paris-Sud, Orsay, during the winter of 1977-1978.