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e-Book Joe Louis: The Great Black Hope epub download

e-Book Joe Louis: The Great Black Hope epub download

Author: Richard Bak
ISBN: 030680879X
Pages: 330 pages
Publisher: Da Capo Press; 1st Da Capo Press ed edition (August 22, 1998)
Language: English
Category: Biographies
Size ePUB: 1815 kb
Size Fb2: 1730 kb
Size DJVU: 1688 kb
Rating: 4.6
Votes: 973
Format: azw lit mbr rtf
Subcategory: Sport

e-Book Joe Louis: The Great Black Hope epub download

by Richard Bak



Joe Louis: The Great Blac. has been added to your Cart. Meanwhile Joe bounced back quickly and eventually knocked out Braddock to become the heavyweight champion of the world.

Joe Louis: The Great Blac. Richard Bak was born and raised in Detroit - the town where Joe Louis learned the sporting craft of boxing. He does a very good job in his biography of Joe Louis to capture the socio-political context of the events in the life of Joe Louis and to demonstrate how that context affected the decisions and actions of Joe Louis in his life and his boxing career.

Re: Joe-Louis-The Great Black Hope. Post by TheOneIsHere2008 26 Jul 2008, 17:26. Brutu wrote: If its a used book store I would get a copy of Joe Louis's autobiography MY LIFE originally published in 1978. Top. TheOneIsHere2008.

Famed for his boxing skills, Detroit's adopted son became a Joe Louis: The Great Black Hope, by Detroit journalist Richard Bak, is an even-handed study of one of the great American athletes of the Twentieth Century. Louis held the heavyweight title from 1937 to 1949, including a stint in the Army during World War II.

103 illustrations, 22 in color.

When Joe Louis (1914-1981) knocked out the German boxer Max Schmeling in 1938 in two minutes and four seconds, the entire nation-black and white-celebrated the "fight of the century" as a victory of the United States against the ominous tide of Nazism

When Joe Louis (1914-1981) knocked out the German boxer Max Schmeling in 1938 in two minutes and four seconds, the entire nation-black and white-celebrated the "fight of the century" as a victory of the United States against the ominous tide of Nazism. Never had an African-American received such universal praise across racial lines.

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Along the way, Richard Bak compassionately, yet evenhandedly, details Louis's private vices: incessant womanizing, reckless spending habits, massive debts to the IRS, and drug abuse. Filled with over one hundred photographs, including twenty-two in colour, Joe Louis is the most comprehensive portrait yet written of one of the greatest African-American heroes who used his fists figuratively,and literally,to fight racism. The Perseus Books Group.

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Joe Louis was born in Alabama, but lived much of his early years in Detroit. Bak, Richard (1998). Joe Louis: The Great Black Hope. p. 103. ISBN 978-0-306-80879-1. 104.

Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Joe Louis : The Great Black Hope. Richard Bak, a native of Detroit, is the author of eight books, including the critically acclaimed Lou Gehrig: An American Genius and Ty Cobb: His Tumultuous Life and Times.

When Joe Louis (1914–1981) knocked out the German boxer Max Schmeling in 1938 in two minutes and four seconds, the entire nation—black and white—celebrated the "fight of the century" as a victory of the United States against the ominous tide of Nazism. Never had an African-American received such universal praise across racial lines. Heavyweight champion for a record twelve years from 1937 to 1949, Louis opened the doors for such future black athletes as Jackie Robinson, Sugar Ray Robinson, and Muhammad Ali.Joe Louis depicts the prizefighter's life, and the times in which he lived, from his childhood in a sharecropper's cabin in Alabama and his formative years in Detroit, to his legendary career, his service in the Army, his stint as a professional wrestler after retiring from boxing in 1951, and his professional demise as an official greeter for a Las Vegas casino. Along the way, Richard Bak compassionately, yet evenhandedly, details Louis's private vices: incessant womanizing, reckless spending habits, massive debts to the IRS, and drug abuse. Filled with over one hundred photographs, including twenty-two in color, Joe Louis is the most comprehensive portrait yet written of one of the greatest African-American heroes who used his fists figuratively—and literally—to fight racism.
Jonide
Probably the best Joe Louis biography I've ever seen. I'm especially interested in Joe Louis in his retirement years, and this book covers it well.
Olelifan
As a boxing fan a must read. A great fighter. Held the title longer than anyone else.
Warianys
Excellent read! Thought I knew more about Joe Louis and his life before reading this. Wow, was I mistaken.
Kirinaya
Richard Bak was born and raised in Detroit - the town where Joe Louis learned the sporting craft of boxing. He does a very good job in his biography of Joe Louis to capture the socio-political context of the events in the life of Joe Louis and to demonstrate how that context affected the decisions and actions of Joe Louis in his life and his boxing career.

After 3 pages of acknowledgments and a prologue are 12 chapters: chapter 1) From `Bama to Black Bottom; chapter 2) A Punch in Either Hand; chapter 3) The Long Shadow of Papa Jack; chapter 4) No Ordinary Joe; chapter 5) Tan Tarzan, Black Messiah; chapter 6) Champion of All, Save One; chapter 7) Knocking Out Hitler; chapter 8) Bummin'; chapter 9) On God's Side; chapter 10) Cruel Twilight; chapter 11) No Joe Louis, No Jackie Robinson; and chapter 12) Your Whole Life is Your Funeral. These chapters are followed by a 3-paged appendix of Joe's Prize Fighting Ring Record, a 5-paged bibliography, and a 9-paged index. Altogether there are 320 pages between the covers with 58 photos.

In chapter 1, we learn that Joe Louis was born Joe Louis Barrow in the desegregated State of Alabama. His stepfather relocated Joe and his family to the racist city of Detroit but with integrated schools where Ford was hiring and paying good wages. Joe had a speech impediment, was bored with schoolwork, but loved learning by doing - especially flag duty.

In chapter 2, Joe had a percipient teacher who recommended that Joe enroll at vocational school where he could learn skills according to Joe's kinesthetic learning style. He also took up amateur boxing and eventually became the national AAU and Golden Gloves national champion. He compiled an amateur record of 50 wins (43 by knockout) and 4 losses.

In chapter 3, Joe made the decision to become a prize fighter. When boxing for money, rules are not followed as they are in amateur boxing. So flagrant are the fixes and rules violations that it's best not to refer to prize fighting as boxing. Bak tells us about Jack Johnson and how he perfected his boxing craft while in jail for illegally prizefighting with his cellmate who had just knocked him out. Bak says that after Johnson became heavyweight champion of the world that he "inflamed public opinion with his open dalliances with women, including his second wife"(p53). Joe Louis's publicists gave Joe an opposite spin - "a God-fearing, Bible-reading, clean-living young man . . . neither a showoff nor a dummy" (p75).

In chapter 4, Joe has his first prizefight on the 4th of July, 1934. One week later, Joe fought his second fight. Eventually, Joe caught the attention of Jewish-American fight promoter Mike Jacobs. Joe said in his autobiography - "If it wasn't for Mike Jacobs I would never have got to be champion" (p87). In this chapter, Joe demolished the Italian giant Primo Carnera at the time when Mussolini had just invaded the starving land of Ethiopia while waving white superiority. Joe Louis gave Mussolini a black eye.

Chapter 5 explains how "Joe's handlers understood that it was crucial to develop and maintain a favorable public image in order to win acceptance by white America" (p110).

In chapter 6, we learn that German fighter Max Schmeling was making a comeback and that Hitler did not want the heavyweight champion - Jewish-American Max Baer, fighting Schmeling and possibly giving Hiter and his theory of white supremacy a black eye like Mussolini suffered when Joe Louis knocked out Primo Carnera. Instead, Schmeling fought Joe Louis. Schmeling was confident that he could defeat Louis, saying "I see something" - he saw how Joe dropped his left after a jab and was subsequently open for a right cross. In their fight, Schmeling dropped Joe several times before delivering the knockout. Fight announcers downplayed any notions of white supremacy but many in the audience were giving voice to it. Back in Germany, Hitler and his Nazis were ecstatic. Schmeling was not allowed by U.S. boxing officials to fight for the heavyweight title at that time. Meanwhile Joe bounced back quickly and eventually knocked out Braddock to become the heavyweight champion of the world.

In chapter 7, Joe had his rematch with Schmeling where he knocked him out in the first round after hitting him so hard to the body that he squealed like a pig. Hitler was humiliated and Joe became America's boxing patriot.

In chapter 8, Joe fought a series of `bums'. In 1936, he paused to go to Hollywood to make a boxing film for the Jewish-American cartel called "Spirit of Youth". Here Bak reveals Joe's penchant for white women and the collusion among the black media to hide his indiscretions from the white public.

In chapter 9, Bak makes short shrift of the Louis-Conn fight. And he doesn't say a word about FDR provoking the Japanese to retaliate, which they did at Pearl Harbor. Nor does he say that Winston Churchill came up with the Pearl Harbor plan in order to suck America back into the second part of the World War. Americans were opposed to making the mistake they had made in the first part of the World War, which was to ignore Thomas Jefferson's maxim of "peace and friendship with all nations, entangling alliances with none". But after FDR allowed the Japanese to hit U.S. naval ships at Pearl Harbor, Americans went war crazy. Joe said "I was mad, I was furious, you name it" (p203). Joe and Billy Conn joined the Army as enlisted, while non-Irish white boxers were made officers. Joe and Billy gave boxing exhibitions while Joe noted Billy's weaknesses for a future rematch after the war.

The remaining chapters tell a tragic story of Joe's fight with the IRS. It's a story where he continually gets pummeled with interest and penalties until he marries Martha Malone Jefferson, California's first black female lawyer, and she gets the IRS to stop hounding him although they never erased the debt. And after he died, the government buried his body in their cemetery at Arlington.

There is also the story of how Joe panicked after the mob killed his friend Sonny Liston. Bak doesn't tell us that Joe had to hide out in a Denver psychiatric hospital in order to be safe from the mob, while his wife convinced the mob that his "paranoid delusions" would discredit him if he ever repeated anything that Liston had told him.

In short, Bak did a great job dealing with a symbol of black power, a symbol of nationalism, and a man with many weaknesses outside of the ring. I am humbled to review this.