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e-Book Nanga Parbat Pilgrimage: The Lonely Challenge epub download

e-Book Nanga Parbat Pilgrimage: The Lonely Challenge epub download

Author: Hermann Buhl
ISBN: 0898866103
Pages: 353 pages
Publisher: Mountaineers Books (February 1, 1999)
Language: English
Category: Mountaineering
Size ePUB: 1634 kb
Size Fb2: 1639 kb
Size DJVU: 1500 kb
Rating: 4.2
Votes: 776
Format: doc lrf mobi txt
Subcategory: Sport

e-Book Nanga Parbat Pilgrimage: The Lonely Challenge epub download

by Hermann Buhl



Hermann Buhl's momentous ascent of Nanga Parbat in 1953 (after Annapurna and Everest, the third 8000m peak to. .

Hermann Buhl's momentous ascent of Nanga Parbat in 1953 (after Annapurna and Everest, the third 8000m peak to be climbed) set an agenda for adventurous mountaineers that inspires to this day. Nanga Parbat Pilgrimage. This may be so, but I think this book conveys what Hermann Buhl wanted to say- after all he approved it. While text such as " are. shining, alluring visions which sear one's heart and wipe out all memory of distress, worry, and disappointment" does not sound like his words, I think they well describe the sensation.

Autobiography of Hermann Buhl, whose solo, unaided climb of Nanga Parbat is thought to be a greater achievement than .

Autobiography of Hermann Buhl, whose solo, unaided climb of Nanga Parbat is thought to be a greater achievement than Hillary and Tenzing's climb on Everest.

Nanga Parbat Pilgrimage book. Autobiography of Hermann Buhl, whose solo, unaided climb of Nanga Parbat is thought to be a greater achievement than Hillary and Tenzing's climb on Everest.

Hermann Buhl is still considered by alpinists and mountaineering historians to be the most complete and advanced mountaineer of his time. Buhl, Hermann (1999). Nanga Parbat Pilgrimage: The Lonely Challenge. Seattle, WA, US. Mountaineers Books. His ascents on rock and snow, solo and as a rope leader, his attitude towards the mountain and his physical elegance have been assessed by such contemporary luminaries as Kurt Diemberger, Marcus Schmuck, Heinrich Harrer, Walter Bonatti and Gaston Rébuffat.

NANGA PARBAT PILGRIMAGE : LONELY CHALLENGE By Hermann Buhl Mint Condition . Mountaineers Books, .

The Lonely Challenge. Back in Print in Mountaineers Books Legends & Lore series, this mountaineering classic is the story of Hermann Buhl's momentous ascent of Nanga Parbat in 1953, which at the time-after Everest and Annapurna-was just the third 8000-meter peak to be climbed.

Nanga Parbat Pilgrimage: The Lonely Challenge: Autobiography of Hermann Buhl, whose solo, unaided climb of Nanga Parbat is thought to be a greater achievement than Hillary and Tenzing's climb on Everest. Mountains of Travel Photos. Nanga Parbat City Lights Homeland Mount Everest Pakistan.

Nanga Parbat Pilgrimage : The Lonely Challenge Hermann Buhl's momentous ascent of Nanga Parbat in 1953 (after .

Nanga Parbat Pilgrimage : The Lonely Challenge. By (author) Hermann Buhl, Translated by Hugh Merrick. Hermann Buhl's momentous ascent of Nanga Parbat in 1953 (after Annapurna and Everest, the third 8000m peak to be climbed) set an agenda for adventurous mountaineers that inspires to this day. Nanga Parbat Pilgrimage, published after his historic first ascent, fired the imagination of a generation of climbers.

Nanga Parbat Pilgrimage. In 1953 Hermann Buhl made the first ascent of Nanga Parbat – the ninth-highest mountain in the world, and the third 8,000-metre peak to be climbed, following Annapurna and Everest. It was one of the most incredible and committed climbs ever made. Continuing alone and without supplementary oxygen, Buhl made a dash for the summit after his partners turned back. On a mountain that had claimed thirty-one lives, an exhausted Buhl waded through deep snow and climbed over technical ground to reach the summit, driven on by an 'irresistible urge'. the lonely challenge. Translation first published in . in 1956 under title: The lonely challenge. Published 1998 by Baton Wicks, Mountaineers in London, Seattle.

To this day, Hermann Buhl's successful 1953 solo climb of 26,620-foot Nanga Parbat remains one of the single greatest achievements in mountaineering history. On this peak, which over the years had claimed 31 lives, Buhl achieved something far beyond the accepted limits of human possibility and reached the zenith of his career. Nanga Parbat Pilgrimage shares Buhl's life, from the physical frailty of his childhood through the many years he spent building his almost superhuman strength to his great triumph in the Himalayas.
HappyLove
This book, written by Hermann Buhl, was largely re-written by his friend and editor Kurt Maix, at least according to Reinhold Messner, author of a climber's biography of Herman Buhl. This may be so, but I think this book conveys what Hermann Buhl wanted to say- after all he approved it.

While text such as "[my recollections of Nanga Parbat] are ... shining, alluring visions which sear one's heart and wipe out all memory of distress, worry, and disappointment" does not sound like his words, I think they well describe the sensation. And that is one of the key differences between this book and Messner's book, "Hermann Buhl- Climbing Without Compromise". This book conveys, as a detached writer would, the thoughts and feelings more than the exact words or technical details of Buhl's life. For those who prefer, or want additionally, to "hear" Buhl's own voice, and many moretechnical details of his accomplishments, I recommend Messner's book.

FYI, the 1987 Movie "The Climb" only covers Buhl's climb of Nanga Parbat, but keeps fairly close to what is described here, and even "quotes" Buhl from this book.
furious ox
mostly just a climbing diary with the Nanga Parbat trip on the very end, but he was so determined to make himself a hard man of the mountains that reading all of the climbs he made really gave you the impression of the hard man he came to be from all of his efforts, and then he died
spacebreeze
Herman Buhl was mountaineer beyond belief. He spent his whole life climbing. He didn't care if he was alone or with someone, he just had to climb. No problem on the mountain was too great. He started out guiding on the Matterhorn, and went to harder climbs. Nanga Parbat was the highest peak he could ascend because of political feelings at that time ( 1940-45, WW2). People from his area in Europe weren't even allowed near Everest. He tells of his experiences and thoughts while making his way around Europe climbing all the great ascents of the alps. If you like climbing and mountaineering you need to meet the greatest. You will be amazed
Uylo
A classic of Himalayan mountaineering. I first read this many years ago - it has not lost it's riveting hold.
Darksinger
Everyone interested in Alpine and Himalayan mountain climbing knows of Herman Buhl (Messner considers him the best climber of all time). His feat of survival alone in a bivouac above 8,000 meters on Nanga Parbat is among the most remarkable achievements in the history of Himalayan Mountaineering!
And here is the most significant area where the book comes up short -- it devotes only a short section, at the very end of the book, to this remarkable expedition. Do not be mislead by the title -- this is not a book about this expedition -- it is an autobiography of Buhl, highlighting some of his remarkable achievements in climbing in the Alps.
My second concern about the book is related to the author's style. Of course, it is a matter of personal preference, but I find Buhl's writing as uninspired and dry, as his climbing capacities are outstanding. One simple comparison of the description of the same episode (climbing the north face of the Eiger) by Buhl as compared to that by Gaston Rebuffat (I highly recommend his book "Starlight and Storm"; they found themselves climbing the Eiger at the same time) clearly shows the much more inspired writing of the French (not to mention that Buhl does not even mention Rebuffat, a well known climber in the Alps by then, by name).
If you are really interested in Herman Buhl, I recommend "Climbing Without Compromise", or the "Kurt Diemberger Omnibus".
Buzalas
As a child, Herman Buhl was one of my greatest heroes. He triumphed where so many others had suffered heartache and death, and persevered when most in that 1953 expedition had given up hope. Perhaps I liked the fact that his objective was not Everest - so famous to the greater masses, but Nanga Parbat. His climbing of this peak was likely a much greater physical achievement than Norgay and Hillary's, yet he received little fame beyond the mountaineering community. Perhaps that is what drew me to this man, his achievements, and to this book.

Nanga Parbat Pilgrimage is an intriguing story, and one that served as an inspiration to me when I was in the midst of my climbing career. I believe that the most compelling chapters are those of his solo exploits on some of the Alp's greatest faces. He was a visionary in many ways, taking a style and attitude that was years ahead of what most at the time considered appropriate. Although he will never likely be considered a great writer, the story and his exploits are what truly set this book apart from others from that time period.

Just as Nanga Parbat is a mountain for mountaineers, so too is Nanga Parbat Pilgrimage a book for climbers. I think that many of the situations and exploits would be better appreciated by those who have had rocks scuttling past their heads and voids of space lurking under their feet, than those who have always stayed upon more solid ground. However, those who haven't may still vicariously find his story of interest.

As I have grown older, and seen the lives of several others who have lived life on the edge cut short, I have perhaps grown to think of this more as a cautionary tale. Herman Buhl was a bold climber and an inspiration to many, but was also a man who died prematurely very shortly after this book went into print. He comes across as likely somewhat selfish, but also as a man who truly loved those wonderful peaks that he once scaled so masterfully. For this reason, this book is certainly worth a look.
Gardall
Why on EARTH is it over 9,000 dollars? Maybe it's time to make a Kindle version and make it affordable so that regular people can enjoy the book. Ridiculously priced.